2018
Anti-Corruption Commission, Sierra Leone, we believe in communication, accountability and transparency.

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End-of-Pilot-and-New-Baseline

Pay No Bribe / Resources Publications

The End of Pilot and New Baseline presents the findings of an ‘end-of-pilot’ study aimed at assessing progress of the implementation of the pilot phase of the DFID supported ‘Pay No Bribe’ program of the Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Commission and also to inform the implementation phase.

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1. Support to Anti - Corruption in Sierra Leone. End of Pilot & New Baseline Survey November 2017

31. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017  Officials offered the following ideas for ways in which petty bribery could be reduced in Sierra Leone: improved salary/conditions of service, prosecution and punishment for offenders, increased transparency, and publishing of the out comes of corruption cases.  14 public officials interviewed in Kono believe the PNB programme will deter bribery in their district. One contrary view from court Kangama Gorama was from a respondent who claimed to have not seen much government/ACC presence in their chiefdom.

5. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 2 Introduction T he Pay No Bribe project with the Anti - Corruption Commission (ACC) of Sierra Leone aims to tackle both the petty corruption that citizens encounter daily (Component 1) and the grand corruption, which affects Sierra Leone’s progress out of pove rty and the destruction caused by the civil war and Ebola (Component 2). The programme is supported by DFID through Coffey International’s London office, and its country office in Freetown. A mixed - methods survey was undertaken in July and August 2016 to p rovide a full baseline for the PNB programme. The survey covered the 4 pilot districts (above) and two control districts: Bonthe and Koinadugu. The programme began a six - month pilot phase in October 2016 in 4 districts: Bombali, Bo, Kenema and Western Ar ea (urban and rural). The pilot phase was completed at the end of April 2017 and the programme subsequently moved into full implementation, with rollout to Kono in October 2017 as an additional district, plus a more limited rollout to all remaining distric ts. Study Purpose, Aim and Objectives The Pay No Bribe project required two ( 2) exercises to be carried out: 1) An end - of - pilot survey in the four pilot and two control districts to assess progress to date against relevant logframe indicators and to support lesson learning into the next phase, comprising a household survey in each district, 12 FGDs and 12 KIIs; and 2) Four FGDs and four KIIs to support an extension of the baseline to Kono as a new district.

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57. a. Do you have any ideas for things that might help you do your job better? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, Go to Q10

38. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 31 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Supervisor Name Date reviewed: dd/mm/yyyy

59. 16. Have you ever experience any situation where you had to pay a bribe? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, Go to 19

11. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 (Respondents were asked: How easy do you think it is for ordinary citizens to report incidence of bribe via: the P NB website, Call Center, App or In Person?) Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline Surveys Figure 3 shows that respondents feel most comfortable reporting incidences of bribes via making a call to the PNB call centre. Reporting in person i s the next most comfortable means of reporting a bribe, although this is not an option under PNB. It is worth noting that many citizens would prefer to call (free of charge) to report a bribe to the PNB call centre partly because many of them already have access to phones for normal use. Fewer citizens use forms of communication that are power/electricity or internet based owing to limited availability. FGD investigations also reveal that citizens are relatively less willing to report incidences of bribe du e to fear of possible backlash and/or threats to their security. Output Indicator 2.3 - Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe Figure 4: Summary of Citizens’ Knowledge of (Describing) One/More Ways of Report ing a Bribe

64. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 51 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017

18. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 not be unconnected with recent Government action of suspension from offices of officers in especially various local councils across the Country. Focu s Groups Discussions (FGDs) Findings from the End - of - pilot Study Overview  The general perception from the FGDs is that the news media has not been effective in reporting the outcome of cases regarding government mistakes and corruption, largely due to a lack of reports on follow up.  The majority of participants believe that influential and top level officials receive less focus in articles about corruption than lower level officials.  Participants in the big towns have more knowledge the PNB programme and of ways to report a bribe than those in rural areas.  More people are discussing corruption with friends and family than before except for Bonthe Island, where participants claim they receive very little information about corruption issues and therefore h ave less to discuss.  The news media rarely discuss corruption/bribery in local languages.  The majority of FGD participants are confident that citizens reporting bribery will make a difference, except for Koinadugu district where citizens stated that they have not seen much change despite their complaints and contributions to different anti - corruption programs.  Only a few participants were willing to admit to having bribed someone or to knowing someone who had bribed someone in the justice sector to access or influence justice. This can be linked to the presence of the court administrators and paramount chiefs in the meetings, or the fact that it is a very sensitive topic, however around two - thirds of FGD participants believe bribery has increased in their district.

66. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 53 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 a. Do you have any ideas for things that might help you do your job better? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, Go to Q10

68. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 55 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 16. Have you ever experience any situation where you had to pay a bribe? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, Go to 19

49. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 42 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex Three: Indicators 1) Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe (for output indicator 2.3) 1. In your opinion, what is a bribe / bribery? 2. Are you aware of the PNB reporting system? If yes, How does it work 3. Are there other methods of reporting that you have used? 2) Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the website, call centre o r app (Output 1.3). 1. Have you ever tried reporting a bribe through 515 or the website? What was your experience? 2. Do you know anyone who did? What was their experience 3) Number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in reveal ing (government mistakes and corruption) (Outcome Indicator 1) 1. Have you ever heard radio stations reporting on government corruption? E.g. calling out perpetrators and outcome of cases 2. If yes, what have you heard? 4) Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference to corruption (Outcome Indicator 3) 1. Do you think your reports/complaints have made a difference? What do you think is done with your reports 5) Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have listened to/read informati on on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months (Output indicator 4.1a) 1. Have you heard anything on the radio/TV/newspaper recently talking about bribery and corruption? i. What was it about? ii. Was it a useful programme/article? iii. Would you like to have more progr ammes like that? 6) Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months (output indicator 4.1b) 1. Have you and family/friends discussed what you heard on the radio/read in the newspapers/watched on TV ? (Probe: if yes, what did you tell them about? Were they interested?)

53. Enumerator Name Date interview completed: dd/mm/yyyy Supervisor Name Date reviewed: dd/mm/yyyy

60. 17. If yes, describe the situation you experience to have paid a bribe? i. ________________________________________________________ ii. _______________________ __________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 18. In which sector did you have to pay a bribe? Education ------------------ 1 Health --------------------- -- 2 Electricity ------------------- 3 Police ------------------------ 4 Water and sanitation ----- 5 19. Have you ever been asked to pay a bribe? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, End interview. 20. In which sector did you have to pay a bri be? Education ------------------ 1 Health ----------------------- 2 Electricity ------------------- 3 Police ------------------------ 4 Water and sanitation ---- 5 21. How frequently have you been asked to pay a bribe? Often ---------- 1 Most times --- 2 Sometimes --- 3 Rarely --------- 4 22. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 ---------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ----------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 ---------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 --------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 -------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 ------- 4

6. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 3 End - Of - Pilot and New Baseline Surveys Methodo logies Survey Scope and Approach End - of - pilot and New Baseline surveys were conducted between 22 July and 31 August 2017 in the four (4) pilot PNB project districts (Bo, Kenema, Bombali and Western Area ( Rural Urban) ) and additional two (2) control gro up districts - Bonthe and Koinadugu. Mixed quantitative and qualitative - methods were employed in a rigorous manner as in the baseline; in relation to sampling (design and calculation), recruitment and training of data collectors (enumerators & supervisor s), pre - testing of survey instruments, data collection, analysis and calculations, data quality assurance, processing, and reporting; for the end - of - pilot and new baseline surveys with the aim of ensuring comparability of findings. The approach comprised the following components:  Household Survey;  Key Informant Interviews;  Focus group discussion; and  Analysis of related questions in the Afrobarometer round 6 dataset. The household survey randomly targeted households to provide information on issues r elating to corruption and perceptions of corruption in their localities, and based on a questionnaire administered to individuals aged 18 years or above, broadly equal numbers of men and women The key informant interviews targeted community authorities/hea ds of related public institutions and other stakeholders, using a guide to structure in - depth interviews with selected heads of public institutions and community authorities The focus group discussion s involved discussions on concepts of corruption /bribery with community groups of individuals including health service users, motor/ okada drivers/riders, market women , youths and adults; etc. A pre - agreed guide was used. The analysis of data on related questions in the Afrobarometer (AB) round 6 dataset involve d the analysis and presentation of data on additional PDT/MCCU questions to the study. In both 2016 and 2017, separate structured and semi - structured questionnaires were designed, piloted and used as baseline and end - of - pilot survey instruments for colle cting data from the respective target audience.

62. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 49 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Enumerator Name Date interview completed: dd/mm/yyyy Supervisor Name Date reviewed: dd/mm/yyyy

4. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 1 Executive Summary This is a ‘two - exercise’ report , presenting the findings of an ‘ end - of - pilot ’ s t u d y aimed at assessing progress of the implementation of the pilot phase of the DF ID supported ‘pay no bribe’ (PNB) pilot program of the Sierra Leone Anti - Corruption Commission and also to inform the implementation phase . The PNB pilot phase began in Septemb er 2016 with activities in 4 districts , with implementation extend ed to a new district, Kono, in October 2017 . This report also presents the results of focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) in Kono, aimed at informing the extension to this new district . The scop e of the end - of - pilot survey was similar to that of the 2016 baseline survey and across the 4 districts ( plus 2 controls) mixed methods were applied: 719 people engaged in a household survey; 238 people engaged in 12 F ocus Group Discussions (F GDs ) ; and 47 people in Key Informant Interviews ( KIIs ) . The study focused on a ‘check - list’ of nine program objective indicators ( ref. Table 1 ) as de tailed in the ToR. Summary of Findings Between the baseline and end - of - pilot surveys t here are some indications of positive changes to perceptions of bribery and corruption in pilot districts , as well as the penetration of PNB messages . Th e se include increased levels of confidence among citizens in pilot districts that they can make a difference to corruption, an increased number of citizens who can describe how to report a bribe through PNB and a marked increase in the percentage of citizens who say they have listened to/heard information on anti - corruption . I n pilot districts , the percentage of respondents saying that they thought that corruption had ‘increased a lot’ fell to 62.25%, from 71.75% in 2015 . Similarly , 9% more respondents than previously thought that corruption had decreased or stayed the same. Nearly 40% of respondents expressed confidence that Government is likely to take action on corruption reports from various sectors. F ocus groups also supported this finding. 1 The percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective at revealing govern ment mistakes and corruption has reduced. Focus groups indicate that this is largely to do with the media failing to follow up and/or report on corruption cases. Similarly, t he percentage of respondents having discussion s about corruption with family /fri ends in the past three months appear s to ha ve reduced . F ocus groups indicate that some citizens are ‘tired’ of discussing corruption related issues with family or friends because ‘ nothing much happens ’. R espondents mostly did not admit to paying bribes to the judiciary in the past six months . B ribes to the judiciary c ould be different from bribery in other sectors in that they may provide benefits for the bribe - giver (e.g. being set free from indictments or judgemen ts ) . As such, there is l ittle benefit to be gained by reporting the bribe. 1 This result may be the effect of recent stringent Government measures directed at potentially culpable local council official s across the Country.

25. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Public officials’ proneness to bribery  33 out of the 39 KIs (87%) interviewed spend their personal funds/resources one way or another to facilitate their work. According to them, they do not have enough operations budget to run their offices so they must make do on their own.  30 respondents (76.9%) believe that corruption is responsible for making thei r jobs more difficult because it impedes the logistic and capacity support needed to do their jobs well.  The most common things that public officials spend their personal resources on to facilitate their jobs are: transportation/mobility and fuel, station ary and office supplies, telecommunications, support payments of support staff such as community teacher, education and healthcare supplies such as medicine and teaching and learning materials.  82% of respondents think their salary is not sufficient to mee t the basic needs of their family (including court administrators who are not paid at all). Therefore, in total, 87% of respondents are not satisfied with their wages. The only positive thing that came out regarding salaries was that 97% of those paid said it came regularly. 6 Public officials’ perception of the level of bribery in the public service  When asked how many of their public officials did they think asked for small bribes, 28 out of 39 (72%) said ‘a lot’.  The most commonly cited reasons for why officials take bribes are: insufficient pay, bad conditions of service, greed, selfishness, lack of integrity and limited resources provided to do the work. KIs claimed that they sometimes had to pay for running the workplace especially in rural communitie s.  Officials offered the following ideas of ways in which petty bribery could be reduced in Sierra Leone: improved salary/conditions of service for public officials, prosecution and punishment of offenders, transparency and publishing of outcomes of corru ption cases. Public Officials confidence in the PNB’s ability to deter bribery/corruption  77% of public officials interviewed believed that the PNB programme would deter bribery in their district. 18%, however stated that they have not yet seen sufficien t results/outcomes from PNB, and 5% said they did not know. 6 This would appear to be an improvement over the baseline and the PNB Pre - Launch meetings i n district HQ towns, when many public officials claimed not to be paid on time.

58. 9. If yes, what are they? i. __________________________________ _______________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 10. In your opinion, what is the extent to many public offic ials ask for small bribes? Choose all that apply. Quite a lot ------------- 1 A lot -------------------- 2 Quite a few ----------- 3 A few ------------------- 4 Don’t know ----------- 5 Refused to answer --- 6 11. Do you think that PNB will deter public officials from asking for bribes? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 12. If yes, how? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. ___________________ ______________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 13. If no, why? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _____________________________ ____________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 14. Do you have any ideas for other ways in which petty bribery could be reduced in Sierra Leone? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 15. If yes, what are the other ways? i. ________ _________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________

50. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 43 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 7) Number/percentage of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months (to establish a 2017 figure) a. Where will you go first to seek justice? 1. local courts 2. chiefs 3. police 4. headman/councillor b. In your opinion, which of the following would you have to bribe the most; 1. local courts 2. chiefs 3. police 4. headman/councillor c. Have you paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months? If ‘yes’ what service did you pay for and how much? 8) Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past year. 1 1. Do you think corruption has increased/decreased in the past 6 months? If yes/no, how? 9) Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the go vernment will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors. (Additional question, no baseline yet) 1. Do you think government/ACC acts on reports they receive on corruption? If yes, what actions? If no? why don't they act 2. Which of the 6 sectors is government likely to act on reports? Why? 10) Estimation of differences ( if there are ) in the number, amounts and types of bribes paid by the different groups of people; a. How often do you experience/encounter bribery? i. Daily ii. Weekly iii. Monthly iv. Each time I tr ansact a business 11) What level of people did you encounter in bribing? 1. High government officials/politicians (To obtain a contract)

69. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 56 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 17. If yes, describe the situation you experience to have paid a bribe? i. ________________________________________________________ ii. _______________________ __________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 18. In which sector did you have to pay a bribe? Education ------------------ 1 Health --------------------- -- 2 Electricity ------------------- 3 Police ------------------------ 4 Water and sanitation ----- 5 19. Have you ever been asked to pay a bribe? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 If No, End interview. 20. In which sector did you have to pay a bri be? Education ------------------ 1 Health ----------------------- 2 Electricity ------------------- 3 Police ------------------------ 4 Water and sanitation ---- 5 21. How frequently have you been asked to pay a bribe? Often ---------- 1 Most times --- 2 Sometimes --- 3 Rarely --------- 4 22. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 ---------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ----------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 ---------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 --------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 -------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 ------- 4

79. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 66 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 d. Output Indicator 1.3: % of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the website, 515 phone call or app (tablet); (no new data collection or analysis necessary as the existing baseline covers all districts). e. Output indicator 2. 3: citizens in programme areas (disaggregated by sex and age) who can describe one or more ways of reporting bribery and corruption issues (average to be developed from existing baseline for all new districts). f. Output indicator 4.1a+b: Number of citizens a ) claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months; b) claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months (average to be developed from existing baseline for all new districts). g. Addition al question: Afrobarometer R6 #54 on citizens’ perceptions of corruption (see Paragraph 6h above). To be calculated for all PNB districts including Kono from AB Question 54 h. Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors. (Additional question, no baseline yet). 11. As in the baseline for the pilot phase, the consultant/s will carry out 4 focus groups in Kono district to identify attitudes towards corruption. The focus groups should be structured as above in Paragraph 8 using the original list of questions that was used for the pre - pilot focus groups (see Annex 3) with additional probing around the judiciary a nd local bribery and corruption issues that could become priorities for PNB. 12. The consultant/s should hold individual interviews with 4 public service delivery officials in Kono), focusing on health, education, judiciary and police where possible. Selecti on will be random but the focus should be on point of delivery officials. Suggested questions are at Annex 1. Tasks 13. In discussion with the Coffey M&E expert, the consultant will refine the implementation plan for the two main areas of work, with clear d efi nitions of the methodology to be used for the survey and of the calculations necessary to provide the baseline figures for the new district . 14. For the post - pilot survey this will include : a. In the 4 pilot and 2 control districts, advising on one urban and o ne rural area in each district from which representative samples can be taken for end of pilot survey. b. Advising on and defining an appropriate quota sampling technique for the survey questions (see Paragraph 6) in the six districts in line with the methodo logy used for the existing data from the 2014/15 Afrobarometer survey. c. Determining a sample of respondents for the questions from which r e pre sentative conclusions can be drawn (using the same methodology as the previous survey) d. Finalising the end - of - pilo t - survey questions to be asked in the 6 districts. e. Contracting, training and deploying sufficient fieldworkers to collect data over a 1 week period, and traveling with them to oversee and ensure quality and rigour of techniques and collection of data. f. Extr acting the numbers against these questions by district. g. Defining an appropriate structure and location for two focus groups in each of the four pilot and two control districts, finalising topics, group composition and management with the Coffey technical c onsultant. h. Conducting 12 focus groups, 2 each per pilot and control district. i. Carrying out individual interviews with local service delivery personnel

56. 5. a . Do you think you will be able to support PNB in any way? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b. If yes, how? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ c. If no, why do you think that you won’t be able to support PNB? ______________________________________________________________ _____________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ Respondent’s Job ( Let us now talk a bit more about your job ) 6. In your opinion, what are the things that enable you to do your job well? ( List ) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ _____________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ 7. Can we discuss the things that prevent you from doing your job well? a. Which of these do you have some control over? i. ________________ _________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ b. Which of these do you feel that you hav e no control over? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 8. a . Can you give an example of something that you have done to help you do your job better? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. ____________________________________________________ _____ iv. _________________________________________________________

22. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 6) Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months  Nearly all participants claim to have discussed corruption with friends and family in the last 3 months and also that they discuss corruption more now than before.  Topics usually discussed include the fact that bribery continues to be persistent in society and that participants would lik e more transparency from government/ACC in relation to actions taken for those found guilty. Common discussions are around police corruption; bribery in schools and health centres and the persistence of bribery in Sierra Leonean culture. 7) Number/percentag e of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months  Even though participants established that they were aware of bribery in the judiciary and of people who have paid bribes to the judiciary, none of them were comfortable to admit tha t they have paid a bribe to the justice sector. This could be attributed to the presence of the court administrators in the meetings or that people from communities where everyone knows everyone do not want to be seen as influencing the outcome of cases. A n admission of paying a bribe to influence the outcome of a case may not be as easy as admitting to paying a bribe for speeding up a service. Bribing in the judiciary is a serious illegal and social offence and could be grounds for further indictment. Also , bribery in the justice sector is of more benefit to the giver than the receiver because the giver does it to free him/herself from problems. 5  The common things that people pay bribes for in the justice sector are: bail, reducing court/ case charges, inf luencing favourable outcomes, and obtaining speedy hearings and case adjournments.  In relation to trust, when asked whom participants trusted most to deliver justice, a majority stated that the Chief/local courts were the most trusted institutions. About a third of participants said that they would trust the police and a small number said other institutions such as CSOs, religious leaders and family/relatives. In the cities, such as Makeni (Bombali Shebora), Kabala (Wara Wara Yagala) and Kenema (Nongowa), p eople trusted the police more than in the rural areas. This could be associated with the limited rural police presence as compared to the local authorities. The disparity in trust between Bonthe Island and Mattru (in the same district) was as a result of t he administrative setting in both areas: Bonthe Island is set up as a city with a mayor and magistrate court that is the first point of contact for dealing with cases. The Paramount Chiefs are not as active as in Mattru Jong. Same goes for Koinadugu and Bo districts.  When asked who of the above they would have to bribe the most, majority said it was the police and then the chief/local courts. 8) Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past year a. A majority of p articipants stated that corruption has increased while just over a third believed it has decreased and a few said that it had stayed the same. Popular among the reasons for believing it had increased was that even though the behaviour of public officials h as changed, the problem still exists, i.e. although public officials are more discreet, bribery fees have even increased in some cases (although they have decreased in others). Respondents believe high - level officials still go free with corruption. On the side of those who said corruption had decreased, participants claimed that people are more aware; therefore, public officials are now more afraid and more discreet. They believe if the trend continues, corruption will decrease even further. 5 Note that from the quantitative data, Kenema is an outlier because there the study found more respondents willing to talk about bribery in petty cases (such as theft, family disputes, insults, harbouring, etc.) .

81. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 68 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 1 Questions to Public Officials in Pilot and Ne w Districts It is important to emphasise that this will be anonymous. People will not be identified, nor will the specific location, just the district and MDA. 1. First I would like to talk about Pay No Bribe. Have you heard about PNB and can you tell me 2 things that it is trying to do? (If the person hasn’t heard about PNB, explain what it has been doing/will do). 2. Do you think that ordinary citizens should be able to report small bribes in this way? Do think that it is a good idea overall? 3. In your opinio n, what might be the good things about PNB? 4. In your opinion, what might be the not - so - good things about PNB? 5. Can you tell us why you think like this? (If no, then don’t probe) 6. Do you think you will be able to support PNB in any way? If so, how? Or 7. Why do you think that you won’t be able/have not been able to support PNB? Can we talk more about your job now? 8. What, in your opinion, are the things that enable you to do your job well? (List) 9. What are the things that get in the way of you doing your job well? (List) 10. Can we discuss the things that prevent you from doing your job well? a. Which of these do have some control over? b. Which of these do you feel that you have no control over? 11. Can you give an example of something that you have done to help you to do your job better? Or do you have any ideas for things that might help you do your job better? 12. Do you consider your GoSL salary sufficient to meet the basic needs of your family? If not, what would be a fair salary? 13. Has your salary arrived regularly all/most / none of the time in the past 6 months? 14. Has the operating budget for your department arrived on time over the last 6 months? 15. If the operating budget has not arrived on time, what is the impact on your work? 16. In your opinion, how many public officials ask for small bribes? (A lot, quite a lot, a few, not many at all, prefer not to answer). 17. Why do you think public officials ask for bribes? 18. Do you think that PNB will deter/has deterred public officials from asking for bribes? Yes/No. If not, why not? 19. Do you have any ideas for other ways in which petty bribery could be reduced in Sierra Leone?

67. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 54 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 9. If yes, what are they? i. __________________________________ _______________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 10. In your opinion, what is the extent to many public offic ials ask for small bribes? Choose all that apply. Quite a lot ------------- 1 A lot -------------------- 2 Quite a few ----------- 3 A few ------------------- 4 Don’t know ----------- 5 Refused to answer --- 6 11. Do you think that PNB will deter public officials from asking for bribes? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 12. If yes, how? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. ___________________ ______________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 13. If no, why? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _____________________________ ____________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 14. Do you have any ideas for other ways in which petty bribery could be reduced in Sierra Leone? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 15. If yes, what are the other ways? i. ________ _________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________

26. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 5 New Baseline Focus Groups Discussions (FGDs) Findings from the New Baseline Study in Kono Summary of Findings  In general, the news media have not been effective in reporting the outco mes of cases regarding government mistakes and corruption.  Only around a quarter of participants, outside of Koidu town have knowledge of ways to report a bribe and the PNB programme. 7  More than three quarters of participants discuss corruption with frie nds and family and claim that they are now discussing corruption more than before.  The news media rarely discuss corruption/bribery in the local Kono language.  Almost all participants are confident that citizens reporting bribery will make a difference.  Only a few participants were willing to answer that they have bribed or know someone who has bribed someone in the judiciary to access or influence justice.  Most participants believe bribery has increased in the district  Nearly half of participants belie ve government acts on reports received regarding corruption while just over half believe it does not. Detailed Findings Effectiveness of the news media in revealing government mistakes and corruption  The general perception of respondents was that the new s media has not been effective in reporting government mistakes and corruption. Many programmes on corruption are being aired and citizens call in to phone - ins to report, but the media has not done much in giving feedback on the outcome of prosecutions. A few participants from Sandor and Fiama claimed to have heard about prosecutions but they were in the minority.  The most common reports people hear on the radio about bribery/corruption are related to illegal police checkpoints, police bribery, hospital co rruption, corruption in the education sector and sexual abuse cases. Using sexual favours as a bribe is largely in the education sector among girls.  All the participants agree that the radio programmes they listen to on bribery/corruption are useful and th at they need more programmes like that. However, they want to hear more on government corruption and the outcomes of cases, especially those found guilty.  Bribery/corruption radio discussions programmes are not discussed in the local Kono language. 7 This is to be expected as the PNB programme was not operational in Kono when the FGDs were carried out

32. PAY NO BRIBE / BASELINE SURVEY 25 Annex One: Survey Methodology Survey Approach The end line survey was conducted in the four (4) initial pilot PNB project districts (Bo, Kenema, Bombali and Western Area Urban) and the additional two (2) districts that provide d a suitable control group as was required for the survey. These was Bonthe and Koinadugu districts that were proposed for the baseline because of their geographical locations and presumed cultural differences. A gain, the mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was employed to collect data for the end line survey . Our approach will rely on three key components, namely: 1. Household Survey, 2. Key Informant Interviews 3. Focus group discussion. If necessary, these was preceded by a desk review which will form the start point of the end line study and will provide an opportunity for the consultant s to understand the context relating to the study as well as the framework for designing the survey , e xamining and underscoring issues relating to corruption in Sierra Leone . The review will inv olve consulting project documents, national polic ies towards tackling corruption and previous studies relating to corruption including Anti - Corruption Commission’s Perception Surveys on Corruption, Transparency International Reports, AfroBarometer Reports, etc. The desk review shall provide secondary data. The household survey target ed the households to provide information on issues relating to corruption and perception on corruption in their localities. The key informant interviews target ed community authorities and officials The focus group discussion involve d discussion s on concepts of corruption with a group of individuals including youths and adults. Survey Tools Separate structured and / semi - structure questionnaires was designed and used as e nd line survey instruments to collect data from the respective target audience. These shall include:  Household Questionnaire  Key Informant Interview Questionnaire/Guide  Focus Group Discussion Guide The household questionnaire form ed the tool for household survey; to be administered to individuals (preferably adults) aged 18+ years. The key informant interview guide was used to carry out in - depth interviews with selected community and/ public sector authorities and stakeholders ( opi nion leaders ). The focus group discussion guide to pertinent issues was used to conduct the focus group discussion.

30. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Detai led Findings Stakeholders’/public officials’ awareness and knowledge of the PNB programme  In Kono, officials from four chiefdoms were interviewed to assess existing knowledge of the PNB programme. It was found that awareness levels of the PNB programme were fairly low. Six out of 16 key informants interviewed had already heard about the PNB programme, and of the six, four were from Koidu town, which indicates that information about the PNB programme had begun to reach urban areas before implementation in Kono district began. Only two out of ten public officials in rural communities were aware.  According to key informants, the good things that might come out of the PNB programme were: public awareness, increased local development, an increase in the respe ct, moral and integrity of the police, better allocation of local budgets, a significant decrease in bribery and an increase in service delivery.  On the other hand, the most popular responses to the not - so - good things that might come about the PNB progra mme is that there could be a tendency for false reporting and that the anonymity and confidentiality of the reporting might encourage citizens to report out of malice rather than on the basis of facts/evidence.  Other common concerns were around the lack o f reliable telephone networks or resources to make complaints in rural areas; perceptions that assurances of anonymity might not be guaranteed, and the fact that illiterate people might not understand how to report.  Also, relating to the knowledge and aw areness of the PNB programme, we found that seven out of the 16 KIs had already supported or been engaged with other anti - corruption activities such as workshops and sensitization programmes. Six out of the seven who were aware were based in Koidu and just one in a rural community. Reporting a bribe via the website, call centre or app  Only four (25%) of the public officials interviewed knew how to report a bribe through the PNB system and three of them were based in Koidu town. More had heard about the PNB but not about how and where to report. Public officials’ proneness to bribery  12 out of the 16 officials interviewed believe corruption is responsible for them not getting the resources needed to do their jobs, and/or for making their jobs more dif ficult through impeding delivery of needed logistic and capacity support. Most officials had to use personal resources to support their workplaces.  The most common items that public officials pay for or provide themselves to facilitate the carrying out of their jobs are: transportation/mobility and fuel, stationary and office supplies, telecommunications, payments for support staff such as community teachers, education and healthcare supplies such as medicine and teaching and learning materials.  Ten officia ls stated that their salaries are not sufficient to meet the basic needs of their family. Together with court administrators, the community teacher and the vaccinator interviewed (who stated that they were not paid) a total of 14 respondents were not satis fied with their wages. Those who are paid a salary said that it arrived regularly. Public officials’ perception of the level of bribery in the public service  When asked how many of their fellow public officials they thought asked for small bribes 11 out of 16 said ‘a lot’.  The most popular reasons given for why officials take a bribe are: insufficient pay, poor equipment and/or conditions of service, greed, selfishness and lack of integrity. Officials’ personal responsibilities in running a work place we re also highlighted.

35. PAY NO BRIBE / BASELINE SURVEY 28 understand the survey questions and questionnaires. Appropriate translation of questions and/or key words was provided into the respective local languages that will enhanc e accurate data collection. D emonstrati on/role play s during training reinforce d data collectors’ skills in administration of the questionnaires. Every effort was employed to provide ‘unbiased’ sample; giving every sample unit equal chance to be selected and thus yielding a representative sample of the research population. Field - level supervision was emphasized; the supervisor s worked closely with the enumerators in survey communities and ensure d all completed questionnaires were checked for completeness, edited and p r o ba ble errors corrected with the respondents in the field. Providing overall oversight and coordination of the data collection, the consultant ensure d high quality data is collected. All completed questionnaires were coded in preparation of data collected to be effectively computerized thus achieving an enhanced database. The computerized data was thoroughly cleaned to ensure dat a quality. Confidentiality during field data collection was maintained. And all data collected was kept in secrete and not divulged to any third party. Data Processing, Entry, Analysis and Reporting Four ( 4 ) data entry clerks were hired and trained to enter data. Data was entered in CSPro data entry editor and exported to SPSS data editor spreadsheet. C S Pro took account of initial data checks. Further, the data was cleaned using SPSS data query wizard as a way of improving data quality and providing quality outputs during analysis. Errors and mismatches due to inconsistencies during data collection were checked and corrected; this will enhance logical consistency and quality of data for quality outputs. Data was analysed using SPSS software package a nd Microsoft Excel. Survey results and findings was presented in tables, charts and graphs reflecting project impact and outcome indicators. Draft survey report was submitted to Coffey International for review a nd final survey report was produced upon feedback/comments on the draft report. Survey Team Core Technical Staff Staff Name Area of Expertise Position Assigned 1. Umaru KATTA Research Design & Administration Study Coordinator 2. Sahr Entua YAMBASU Research Design & Data Management Principal Research Associate Support Staff Staff Name Assigned Task 3. Abu SAMURA Office/Admin. Assistant 4. Mohamed KALLON Field Assistant

82. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 69 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 2 Questions to guide Focus Groups in Pilot and Control districts The focus groups will be guided and should cover issues around the questions below. If possi ble, it would be useful to note separately the opinions of any local service delivery officials present in the group. a. How do citizens define bribery? 5 b. What do you think about bribery? (eg. against the law; necessary evil etc.) c. Have your opinions about bri bery changed over the last few months/since the end of the rainy season? (Probe: if so, why, in what ways, etc.?) d. Do you think that corruption has got better or worse over the last few months/since the end of the rainy season? e. Have you heard about the Pay No Bribe Campaign? (Probe: if ‘yes’ can you tell us about what it does?) f. What do you think about the PNB campaign? (Probe: Is it a good idea? Do you think it can make a difference? Do you think people have used it? What is not good about it?) g. What ki nds of services do you pay for? (Probe: which services are most affected, if any?). h. Have you changed the way you pay for services recently? (Probe: if so, in what ways?) i. What do you think of when you talk about ‘justice services’ (i.e. local courts, ch iefs, police (bail), magistrates, high courts, bailiffs etc) j. What do you think about these different justice services? k. What services do you pay bribes for with the judiciary? l. How often and how much do you pay? m. Have you paid a bribe to the judicia ry in the last 6 months? If ‘yes’ what service did you pay for and how much? n. Do you think that you can refuse to pay a bribe? (Probe: what might happen if you do?) o. Would you feel safe to report a bribe? (Probe: if ‘yes’ why? If ‘no’ what might happen to yo u?). p. Have you noticed any changes in the behaviour of service providers over the last few months, in relation to: i. How they do their work (Probe: in what ways? Which service providers?) ii. How they ask for bribes (Probe: in what ways? Which service providers?) iii. The amounts that they ask for in bribes (Probe: more or less? Which service providers?) iv. The times that they are available? (Probe: in what ways? Which service providers?) q. Have you heard anything on the radio/TV/newspaper recently talking about bribery and corruption? (Probe: was it a useful programme/article? What did it say? Would you like to have more programmes like this?) r. Have you talked to family/friends about what you heard on the radio/read in the newspapers/watched on TV? (Probe: if yes, what did y ou tell them about? Were they interested?) 5 Many citizens do not necessarily view bribery as corruption, or may not recognise that they are subject to corruption.

27. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Kno wledge of where to report a bribe  Just under a quarter of the 105 FGD participants in Kono knew where to report bribes, whether through the PNB reporting system or outside. Of the 25 who knew, 20 were from Koidu town. 8  Outside of the PNB, people said tha t they could report bribes through civil society organizations and the police. In Kangama Gorama, there was an anonymous reporting box stationed by the council where citizens could report. However, participants were not confident about anonymity so they di d not use it much. Citizens’ engagement in the corruption discourse  Over three - quarters of participants claimed have discussed corruption with family/friends /relatives in the last 3 months. They stated that it was a topic of interest in their communiti es and had become popular because of generally increased levels of awareness among citizens.  Regarding whether corruption is being discussed more than before, in general people stated that they were discussing it more. However, participants in Kangama Gor ama and Sandor stated that people are beginning to get tired of discussions of bribery and corruption because the changes are insignificant and they do not get reports or evidence of government’s reactions to cases being reported. They claimed that it is a waste of their time to discuss it.  The common topics of discussions are – police injustice (perpetrators are set free, people have to pay for bail, police bribery (e.g. through illegal checkpoints to collect money), hospital corruption (paying for nutri tional supplies and healthcare services that should be free) and education sector corruption (bribing for promotion to the next class, grades, admissions, etc.). The lack of feedback from government/ACC about the outcomes of cases and sentences is another popular topic of discussion. Citizens’ confidence in making difference to corruption  Almost all participants were confident that citizens reporting bribery could make a difference. However, they believe that it will only happen if government responds to citizens’ reports, if feedback is given and offenders are punished if found guilty. The few who did not believe that reporting bribery would make a difference said that this was because they have not seen actual results from citizen’s reporting yet. Brib e to the judiciary in the last 6 months  Only one participant claimed to have paid or known someone who had paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months. There was a sense of hesitation in answering the question directly. However, when asked if they believed that bribery is widespread problem in the judiciary, all participants in all four chiefdoms agreed that it was.  Regarding whom participants trusted to obtain justice, slightly less than half trusted the chief the most, just over one fifth trusted the police, and a minority claimed to trust other sources such as CSOs and relatives/family. Only a very few participants said they trusted the councillor and/or the headman. 8 The PNB was not operational in Kono when the FGDs were carried out

71. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 58 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------ d . What is/are the action(s) by which ‘c’ can be accomplished? Refuse to pay bribes -------------------------------- 1 Report requests for bribes ------------------------ 2 Enhance publi c knowledge about service fees ------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- e . Where do you think you should report bribery when you experience it? (e.g. To the Police ------------------------------------------------------- 1 To the ACC/PNB --------------------------------------------- ------ 2 To the court --------------------------------------------------------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------- 3. Estimation of differences ( if there are ) in the number, amounts and types of bribes paid by the different groups of people; Q. a. How often do you experience/encounter bribery? Daily -------------------------------------- 1 Weekly ------------------------------------ 2 Monthly ----------------------------------- 3 Each time I have to transact a business -------------- 4 ------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------ b. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le 100,000 -------- 4

74. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 61 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 9. Probing for alternative actions citizens take when they refuse to pay bribes; Q. If you refused to pay a bribe, what action(s) would you take next: Will report the incident ------------------------------------------- 1 Will go about my normal business ----------------------------- 2 Warn/admonish the perpetrator -------------------------------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- 10. Finding out people’s level of confidence in their refusal to pay bribes; Q. If you refused to pay a bribe, would you be worri ed for a repercussion? No - not at all ------------------------------- 1 Yes - somehow ----------------------------- 2 Yes - very much ----------------------------- 3 11. Finding out consequences of people’s refusal to pay bribes; Q. In your opinion, what do you t hink would happen if people refused to pay bribes? Nothing At All ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 Bribery generally would h ave been reduced drastically ------------------------ 2 Bribery generally would have been completely eradicated -------------------- 3 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- 12. Investigating purpose(s) of paying bribes in the power and water sectors. Q. What (if ever) has made you pay a bribe in?: a. the Power sector? (e.g. to avoid more expensive connection charges, etc.) To avoid more expensive connection charges ---------------------------------------- 1 To avoid high bills/tariffs ------------------------------------------------------------------ 2 To avoid being disconnected -------------------------------------------------------------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------

75. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 62 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 b. the Water sector? (e.g. to avoid more expensive connection charges, to avoid high bills/tariffs, to avoid be ing disconnected, etc.) To avoid more expensive connection charges ---------------------------------------- 1 To avoid high bills/tariffs ------------------------------------------------------------------ 2 To avoid being disconnected ------------------------- ------------------------------------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------- -- 13. Assessment of the frequency and amount paid; Q.a. How often have you had to pay this bribe? Every time you have needed the service ---------------------- 1 Sometimes when you need the service ------------------------ 2 Rarely ------------------ ------------------------------------------------ 3 Not at all -------------------------------------------------------------- 4 b. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 ------------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 --------- -------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 ----------- 4 14. Circumstances under which the police ask for bribes; Inquiry into the frequency and amount people pay ( Drivers & Riders ); and Q. a. Let is highlight (if we know) the circumstances under which the Police ask for bribes. Driving without valid driver’s licence ----- 1 Drunk driving/drinking and driving ----- 6 Overloading ------------------------------------- 2 Driving an unlice nsed vehicle ----------- 7 Smooth tyres ------------------------------------ 3 Driving an uninsured vehicle ------------- 8 Over - speeding ---------------------------------- 4 Upon a wrong parking --------------------- 9 Faulty vehicle lights ----------------- ---------- 5 Driving without a seat - belt on ----------- 10

83. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 70 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 3 Focus Group questions for Kono a. How do citizens define bribery? 6 b. When you give someone money for something, do you regard it as a ‘payment’ or as a ‘gift’ or ‘present’. c. How is the paying of bribes per ceived by different groups of citizens (male/female; young/old; urban/rural; rich/poor)? d. Are there differences in the number, amounts and types of bribes paid by the different groups of citizens outlined in b. above? e. Do you think that corruption has got better or worse over the last six months (ie. since the end of the rains)? f. What do people do when they encounter a request for a bribe? g. What form of payments is typically used? E.g. cash; food; animals; services; sexual favours etc? h. To what extent does br ibery impede people’s access to free health and education services (if at all)? i. What services do people pay bribes for in health and education? (e.g. appointments, medicines, place in school, end of year report etc.)? j. What do people think of when they ta lk about ‘justice services’ (i.e. local courts, chiefs, police (bail), magistrates, high courts, bailiffs etc) k. What do people think about these different justice services? l. What services do people pay bribes for with the judiciary? m. How often and how much d o people pay? n. If people refuse to pay, what do they do instead? o. Are people frightened about not paying? p. If people don’t pay, what happens? q. For the power and water sectors, how are bribes used (e.g. do people pay to avoid more expensive connection charges)? r. How often and how much do they pay? s. On what occasions do the police ask for bribes? How much and how often do people pay? t. If people don’t pay the police, what happens? u. In which other sectors do citizens often pay for services? 6 Many citizens do not necessarily view bribery as corruption, or may not recognise that they are subject to corruption.

21. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 End - of - pilot FGDs: Key Findings A total of 240 participants were engag ed in the End - of - pilot FGDs in Bo, Bombali, Bonthe, Kenema and Koinadugu. Based on the project indicators, the following issues emerged; 1) Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe (Output indicator 2.3)  A majority of FDG participants in pilot districts were aware of the PNB campaign and how/where to report a bribe, compared with just under half of participants who could describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe during the baseline study.  All participants had go od knowledge of what a bribe is and its effect on society, which is similar to the baseline findings. Awareness of the PNB programme has grown in pilot districts over the year of implementation.  Other methods of reporting bribes (apart from the PNB system ) that were highlighted in the discussions included were reporting to the police, local authorities and civil society organisations 2) Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the websit e, call centre or app (Output 1.3)  In the end - of - pilot FGDs, only three participants claimed to have experienced reporting a bribe via the website, call centre or app and they claimed that it was easy to report. Two of them said they were asked their names . 4 It was a general concern that people were asked their names and location in phone - in radio programmes. 3) Number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing government mistakes and corruption  Half of FGD participants s aid the news media are not effective in reporting government corruption. By this they mean that the media report government bribery/corruption in general but do not give details of cases. Participants expressed concern over media effectiveness in providing feedback on the outcomes of cases.  All the participants of the FGDs agreed the radio programmes they listen to on bribery/corruption are useful and that they would like to have more programmes like that.  However, they would like the programmes to report on the outcomes of cases, especially those found guilty. 4) Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months  Most participants claimed to be radio listeners and all of them have listen ed to/read information on bribery/corruption. However, a few participants do not listen to or have no access to radios. Most of those who do not listen to radio are from Warawara Bafodia chiefdom in Koinadugu district where they do not have a radio freque ncy. 5) Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference to corruption  A majority of participants are confident that citizens reporting bribery will make a difference. Those with a dissenting view attributed their lack of confidence t o everyday evidence of corruption, persistence of bribery and their doubts about assurances of anonymity. Most of those with dissenting views claimed that things would remain the same.  Those citizens who believe they could make a difference also emphasize d that the difference will only be made if government sets examples, and deploys more ACC monitors in the field. 4 it is possible that they were calling the ACC’s general reporting line rather than the call centre

65. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 52 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 5. a . Do you think you will be able to support PNB in any way? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b. If yes, how? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ c. If no, why do you think that you won’t be able to support PNB? ______________________________________________________________ _____________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ Respondent’s Job ( Let us now talk a bit more about your job ) 6. In your opinion, what are the things that enable you to do your job well? ( List ) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ _____________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ 7. Can we discuss the things that prevent you from doing your job well? a. Which of these do you have some control over? i. ________________ _________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ b. Which of these do you feel that you hav e no control over? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. _________________________________________________________ iv. _________________________________________________________ 8. a . Can you give an example of something that you have done to help you do your job better? i. _________________________________________________________ ii. _________________________________________________________ iii. ____________________________________________________ _____ iv. _________________________________________________________

80. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 67 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 j. Triangulating and analysing the data gathered through the different methods 15. Tasks for updating baseline will include: a. Advising on and agreeing the methodology for producing calculations for the baseline to include Kono (the existing baseline also covers Bonthe and Koinadugu), and including the Judiciary. b. Calculating the baselines. c. Carrying out 4 focus group discussions in Kono district, similar to those carried out prior to the commencement of the pilot phase. d. Carrying out individual interviews with 4 service delivery personnel in Kono (methodology for selection to be agreed). e. Triangulating and analysing th e data collected through the different methods Deliverables 16. The consultant/s will deliver the following:  A draft end - of - pilot document with updated data from the survey questions, including additional baselines (compared where relevant with the original findings), notes of the focus group discussions, a short report on the individual interviews with service d elivery officials, and overall conclusions.  A baseline survey document for the new district containing the updated baseline figures for impact indicator 1, outcome indicators 1 and 3, and output indicators 2.3 and 4.1 a+b; information against additional q uestions; notes of the focus group discussions, a short report on the individual interviews with service delivery officials, and overall conclusions.  In both documents, unusual or unexpected information should be highlighted so that it can be followed up i f necessary. Any additional sectors that could become priorities for PNB reporting in Kono should be identified. All data will be disaggregated by sex, age and district. Timescales 17. The report should be delivered no later than 31 st May. Regular updates on the progress achieved are required every week. Reporting 18. The consultants will report to the Team Leader in the Coffey Office in Freetown. Technical issues may be discussed with the M&E consultant.

51. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 44 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 2. mid - level 3. Low - level public officials (to speed ‘things’ up or avoid wasting time) 12) Inquiries into the form of payments that are typically used. a. In which form do people usually pay a bribe? 1. Cash 2. Food and Animals 3. Services and favours 4. Sexual favours 5. Other 13) Inquiry into which services people pay bribes for in the 4 sectors, (e.g . appointments, medicines, place in school, end of year report, etc 1. Which services have you had to pay bribes for in the: 1. Health sector? ( Probe : e.g. consultation, medicines, etc.) 2. Education sector? ( Probe : e.g. appointments, supplies, place in school, e tc.) 3. Justice sector? ( Probe : ......) 4. Law enforcement sector? ( Probe : take from the app.) 5. Power sector? ( Probe : ......) 6. Water? ( Probe : take from the app.) 14) Consequences of people’s refusal to pay bribes; a. In your opinion, what do you think would happen if people refused/stopped paying bribes? 15) Changes in service delivery in the areas of the pilot program a. Have you noticed any changes in the behaviour of service providers over the last few months, in relation to the 4 sectors of the pilot program? How? E.g. is there a change in behaviour or method? i. Water ii. Power iii. Health iv. Education b. Do you think the PNB Campaign has reduced corruption/bribery in your district? If yes, how? If no, why?

54. Discussions around the PNB Concept ( We will begin this discussion with inquiring a bit into your knowledge about the pay no bribe – PNB campaign ) 1. First I would like to talk about Pay No Bribe. a . Have you heard about pay no bribe (PNB) initiative of Anti - Corruption Commission? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b . Enumerator: If the person hasn’t heard about PNB, explain what it will be doing as follow: “ “ PND is an initiative of ACC. The PNB is an innovative reporting mechanism for citizens to anonymously report incidents of petty corruption and bribery” Now can you tell me 3 things that PNB is trying to do? i.__________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________ ii._______________________________________________________________________________ ___________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________ iii.__________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________ __________________________________________________________ ________________________ 2. a . Do you think that ordinary citizens should be enabled to report small bribes in identified way in Q1b? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b . Do you think that it is a good idea overall? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 3. In your opinion, what might be the good things about PNB? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ 4. In your opinion, what might be the not - so - good things about PNB? _______________________________________________________________ ____________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___

78. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 65 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 g. Number/percentage of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months (to establish a 2017 figure) h. Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past ye ar. 2 (Additional question from PDT/MCCU, baseline to be calculated from the Afrobarometer 2014/15 survey by district and by MDA) i. Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors. ( Additional question, no baseline yet) 7. The consultant/s will also interview local service delivery officials to understand more about the ways in which PNB has impacted upon their lives if any, their attitudes to bribery and corruption and the context in w hich behavioural changes take place in relation to bribery. Suggested questions are in Annex 1, and will be agreed with the consultant/s. 8. In addition, focus group discussions will be carried out in the six districts, to provide additional information abo ut aspects of bribery that have emerged during the pilot phase, and to probe any changes, especially on issues such as citizens’ sense of empowerment/feelings that citizens can make a difference; examples of changes/challenges; views on the media; and othe r feedback on the PNB programme where applicable. The focus groups will be structured in a similar way to those in the pilot survey, and will contain representatives of different population groups in relation to gender; age; employment status; income; soci al status, and other socio/economic variables, (including health service users, okada drivers, market women etc). Suggested questions are in Annex 2 9. From focus group, KII and survey data, the consultant will provide reflections and feedback on the use and relevance of the methods of reporting bribes (Phone, tablet/App or website). The consultant should also identify any opportunities for leveraging the impact of this programme by coordinating with other organisations. 10. For the updating the baseline in K ono, data from Afrobarometer Round 6 3 and the original baseline survey will be analysed to provide updated baseline information for relevant logframe indicators. This will relate to: a. Impact Indicator 1: from AB data, establish a baseline for payments to t he judiciary nationally. AB Question 55L b. Outcome Indicator 1: number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing government mistakes and corruption; (analysis of Kono district from AB Question 46 4 ). c. Outcome Indicator 3 : % of people who are aware of how ordinary people can make a difference in fighting corruption, disaggregated by district, sex and age; (no new data collection or analysis necessary as the existing AB baseline covers all districts). 2 In your opinion, over the past year, has the level of corruption in this country increased, decreased, or stayed the same? (Increased a lot, Increased somewhat; Stayed the same; Decreased somewhat; Decreased a lot; Don’t know 3 2 014 - 2015 4 The AB data can be analysed down to district level and the methodology is tailored to ens ure representative coverage. S ample information is available for the different surveys: eg.for the 2014 - 15 survey, 37.6% of respondents had no formal education, 15% had never had an occupation (35% agric, farming, fishing, forestry) and 78.8% had only eve r worked for themselves. All questions can be analysed by urban/rural; gender; age etc , and the gender split is approximately 50/50

29. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Citizen’s confidence in refusing to pay a bribe  When asked what participants think would happen if people ref used/stopped paying bribes, the most common response was that things would improve generally and that the country would be better developed.  However, almost all participants thought that service delivery would be delayed as a result of refusing to pay bri bes. For example, any attempt at refusing to pay a bribe to a public official would normally result in longer waiting times, limited access to justice, undesirable customer service or even an absolute denial of a service. Changes in behaviour and attitud e of public officials as a result of ACC/PNB  Even though the PNB has not started implementation in Kono, there have been some changes in the behaviour of public officials. In particular, the police are being more discreet in taking bribes. Participants cla imed that police are now starting to use middlemen and other means such as Airtel money transfers and cash boxes in corners. Drivers often hide a bribe in documentations when they are asked to present them.  In the health sector, free healthcare medicines and food supplies are now sold in secret. School authorities are said to have added more requests and charges that would force parents and students to give money/tokens. These changes may be attributed to other ACC or anti - bribery interventions, or to som e information about PNB having reached Kono already. Citizens’ confidence that PNB will reduce bribery in the district  Nearly all participants think the PNB Campaign will reduce corruption/bribery in Kono district, and the remainder said either that it w ouldn’t or that they didn’t know. However, participants stated that for the PNB campaign to succeed, more monitoring is needed, more ACC/PNB staff/monitors should be stationed at chiefdom level and more radio discussions and programmes should be done in th e local Kono languages. Key Informants Interviews (KIIs) Findings from the New Baseline Study in Kono The key informant interview section of the baseline survey concentrated on public officials. Interviews focused on their knowledge and awareness o f the Pay No Bribe (PNB) campaign, the PNB reporting systems, factors that enhance officials’ tendencies for involvement in bribery and their roles in fighting bribery and corruption. 10 Sixteen K ey Informants were interviewed. Summary of the Findings  Publ ic officials in Koidu Town were more aware of the PNB programme than those in the rural areas.  There appears to be a lack of resources for public officials to perform their duties - many public officials claim that they use their personal resources to faci litate their work.  In the rural areas where the local courts are the primary administrators of justice, Court Chairmen are not paid, which makes them prone to bribery especially as they handle sermon fees and other court financial matters.  Most of the pub lic officials believe the PNB can reduce bribery but are worried that false/untrue reporting might affect the validity of citizens’ reports.  Public officials in the rural communities have had limited exposure to anti - bribery/corruption activities. 10 See ToRs in Annex

24. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017  In the justice sector, the common perception is that officials can be bribed to delay or speed up cases and/or make things complicated for the pe ople who are least familiar with proceedings by using unfamiliar terms and charges.  In the health sector, officials often tell the people that the free healthcare drugs are unavailable. They then offer to sell the drugs to the patient and pocket the money themselves.  In the education sector, bribes are disguised in requests for exorbitant handwork materials from parents and/or requests for children to carry out farming or household tasks for teachers Citizens’ confidence that PNB has reduced bribery in th e district  Many participants stated that the PNB campaign has contributed to reducing bribery in their district because some public officials were more aware and more fearful of taking bribes openly.  About a quarter of FGD participants in control districts said that bribery had not reduced, that things remained the same and bribery is still rampant.  A few participants on Bonthe Island said they do not know whether bribery has reduced or not because they have never been given feedback about activities and st atistics from the PNB. Warawara Yagala expressed the same view that they didn't know much about the PNB but based on what they see, it has not made a difference. (N.B. These are control districts, thus a strong impact would be unusual). Key Informant s Interviews (KIIs) Findings from the End - of - pilot Study (Public Officials) The key informant interview section of the baseline survey concentrated on public officials. The survey team carried out individual interviews to probe officials’ knowledge and awa reness of the Pay No Bribe (PNB) campaign, the PNB reporting systems, factors that encourage officials to ask for/expect bribes and those that would encourage them to stand up to bribery. A total of 39 public officials were interviewed. Only Kenema, Makeni , Freetown and Bo cities had government water supply and electricity. Summary of the Findings  Public officials in urban areas are more aware of the PNB programme than those in rural areas.  There is a widespread lack of resources for public officials to perform their duties and many public officials use personal resources to facilitate their work.  In the areas, where the local courts are the primary administrators of justice, Court Chairmen are not paid, which makes them prone to bribery as they are res ponsible for handling summons fees (court fees levied on the defendant before they appear in the local court) and other financial matters in the court.  Most of the public officials believe the PNB can reduce bribery but are worried that false reporting (w here a complainant/reporter makes an untrue claim out of malice/mischief) might affect the validity of citizens’ reports. There are also concerns about anonymity.  Public officials in rural communities have had limited exposure to anti - bribery/corruption a ctivities such as meetings, workshops or trainings on how to deal with or prevent bribery. Key Findings Public officials’ awareness and knowledge of the PNB Campaign and ways of reporting a bribe  About two thirds of KIs had heard about the PNB campaign. However, around 70% of informants who knew about PNB did not know the details of the reporting system. They knew about PNB but not where/how to report.  When asked about benefits that might come out of a PNB programme, KIs stated increased public awarenes s, citizens’ access to reporting, improved public financial management, socio - economic development, decreases in bribery and improved service delivery.

73. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 60 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 b. people’s access to education? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- --------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------------------- 7. Inquiry into which services people pay bribes for in the health and education sector, (e.g. appointme nts, medicines, place in school, end of year report, etc. Q. Which services have you had to pay bribes for in the : a. Health sector? ( Probe : e.g. consultation, medicines, etc.) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------- b. Education sector? ( Probe : e.g. appointments, medicines, place in school, end of year report, etc.) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------- 8. An inquiry into the frequency and amount. Q.a. How often have you had to pay th is bribe? Every time you have needed the service ----------------------------------------- 1 Sometimes when you need the service ------------------------------------------ 2 Rarely ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- 3 Not at all --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------- - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------- b. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le10 0,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 -------- 4

76. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 63 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- ----------------------------------------- ------------------------ b. How often have you had to pay a bribe under any of these circumstances? Every time you have had an encounter --------------------------------- 1 Most times you have had an encounter ------------------------------ - - 2 Sometimes when you have had an encounter ------------------------ - 3 Rarely -------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 4 Not at all ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 5 c. How much have you had to pay per encounter? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 ------------ - 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 ----------- 4 15. Consequences of people’s refusal to pay bribes to the police. Q. What do you think will happen if people refused to pay br ibes to the police? Nothing at all ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 Bribery to police would have been reduced drastically ------------------ 2 Bribery to police would have been completely eradicated -------------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- Thank participants for their time

63. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 50 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Discussions around the PNB Concept ( We will begin this discussion with inquiring a bit into your knowledge about the pay no bribe – PNB campaign ) 1. First I would like to talk about Pay No Bribe. a . Have you heard about pay no bribe (PNB) initiative of Anti - Corruption Commission? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b . Enumerator: If the person hasn’t heard about PNB, explain what it will be doing as fo llow: “ “ PND is an initiative of ACC. The PNB is an innovative reporting mechanism for citizens to anonymously report incidents of petty corruption and bribery” Now can you tell me 3 things that PNB is trying to do? i.__________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________ ii.___________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________ iii._______________________________________________________________________________________ ___ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________ 2. a . Do you think that ordinary citizens should be enabled to report small bribes in identified way in Q1b? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 b . Do you think that it is a good idea overall? Yes ------- 1 No ------- 2 3. In your opinion, what might be the good things about PNB? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___ 4. In your opinion, what might be the not - so - good things about PNB? ___________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___

72. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 59 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 c. What type of bribery have you encountered? With High/middle - level Government officials/politicians for e.g. contracts ------------ 1 Low - level public officials to speed ‘things’ up or avoid waste of time ------------ -------- 2 Having to use influence/familiarity/acquaintance with getting what you want -------- 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 4. Inquiry into citizens’ reacti on when they encounter a request for a bribe; Q.a. What would you do if you encounter a situation to pay a bribe? Will pay ----------------------------- 1 Will not pay ------------------------ 2 Will pay but report --------------- 3 Will not pay and will report ---- 4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- --------------------------------------------------- -------------- 5. Inquiries into the form of payments that are typically used. Q.a. In which form have you had to pay a bribe? Cash ---------------------------------------- 1 Food ---------------------------------------- 2 Animals --------------------------- --------- 3 Services ------------------------------------ 4 Sexual favours ---------------------------- 5 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- - ---------------------------------------- 6. Assessment of the extent to which bribery impedes people’s access to free health and education services (if at all); Q. In your opinion, to what extent does bribery impede: a. people’s access to free health? --- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------

33. PAY NO BRIBE / BASELINE SURVEY 26 Sample design Except otherwise revised by the Client for the end line , data was collected from the sample (size) as in the baseline primarily to ensure comparability. The sample design , as in the baseline therefore, employ ed probability sampling technique s (cluster, stratified and systematic) to select the appropriate sample for the survey . This will ensure that the sample is repres entative and survey results provide an unbiased estimate of the views of the population. A random selection at every st a ge of sampling and probability proportionate to population size (PPPS) applied for the sampling. Essentially, the PPPS provides a self - w eighting mechanism to the sample. The sampling was done separately for pilot and control districts. The sample was selected at two stages. At the first stage, sample of enumeration areas (EAs) was selected. The EAs constitute the primary sampling unit. T he list of all enumeration areas, as determined by Statistics Sierra Leone, in all the six (6) survey districts will form the sampling frame. At the second stage, ten (10) households selected per sample EA for interview. Households were selected using the “random walk” in the absence household listing for pre - selection of households. For the key informant interviews, two (2) community authorities/stakeholders (opinion leaders) were chosen at random. Two (2) EAs were randomly selected per (pilot) survey dist rict for the focus group discussions (FGDs). Each FGD consist ed of 10 - 12 persons from the communities at large; taking full cognizance of participant age, gender, and occupation. Sample Calculation The sample size of the primary sampling unit (PSU) was determined by the number of households to be surveyed in six (6) districts. Hence, the sample size of households was calculated by the formula given below: _________________________________________________________________________ n = N Z 2 ∗ 0 . 25 [ d 2 ∗ N − 1 ] + [ Z 2 ∗ 0 . 25 ] where;  n is sample size required  N is total (estimated) households in the domain  Z is number of standard deviation units of the sampling distribution corresponding to the 95% confidence level.  d is 5% precision level or margin of error. _________________________________________________________________________ Anticipating 80% response rate for the survey, the sample was inflated by the response rate in order to pay - off for the possible non - response. The sample was allocated across the s ix (6) districts using probability proportional to size (PPS) approach. Applying the formula, sample sizes were 480 and 240 households, each, in pilot and control districts respectively. The sample sizes were calculated based on household proportion for the districts computed from household numbers in the 20 15 Housing and Population Census .

77. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVE Y 64 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 7: Terms of Reference Baseline and End of Pilot survey of corruption in Sierra Leone 26/04/2017 1. The Pay No Bribe project with the Anti - Corruption Commission of Sierra Leone aims to tackle both the petty corruption that citizens encounter daily (Component 1) and the grand corruption, which affects Sierra Leone’s progress out of poverty and the destruction caused by the civil war and Ebola (Component 2). The programme is supported by DFID thr ough Coffey International’s London office, and its country office in Freetown. 2. The programme began a six - month pilot phase in October 2016 in 4 districts: Bombali, Bo, Kenema and Western Area (urban and rural). The pilot phase will be completed at the end of March 2017 and the programme will subsequently move into a full implementation phase, with rollout to Kono as an additional district. 3. A mixed - methods survey was carried out in July and August 2016 to provide a full baseline for the PNB programme. The survey covered the 4 pilot districts (above) and two control districts: Bonthe and Koinadugu. 4. Two exercises are now required: a. An end - of - pilot survey in the 4+2 districts to assess progress to date against relevant logframe indicators and to support les son learning into the next phase; and b. An extension of the baseline to include Kono as a new district. 5. The new baseline extension exercise will be lighter than the full baseline, but will employ a similarly rigorous approach to data collection, analysis and calculation. Findings should be comparable. 6. For the end - of - pilot survey , a consultant will be contracted to follow up on logframe specific indicators in the four pilot and two control districts that were previously analysed. The survey will be design ed around the logframe indicators and carried out using the same methodology as previously 1 . Questions will cover: a. Number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing (government mistakes and corruption) (Outcome Indicator 1) b. Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference to corruption (Outcome Indicator 3) c. Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the website, call centre or app (Output 1.3). d. Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe (for output indicator 2.3) e. Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months (Output indicator 4.1a) f. Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in t he last 3 months (output indicator 4.1b) 1 Note that some indicators in the finalised logframe differ from those in the earlier version

23. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Number/perce ntage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors  The majority of participants believe that government acts on reports received on bribery/corruption. However, the common concern was that the action s are slow and mostly do not target high level officials. Additional Information  The majority of participants consider bribery a daily occurrence. They stated that every time a person interacts with a public official there is the possibility of bribing t hem. The most common means of exchange in a bribe is cash , with food and animal products and sexual favours following. It emerged that food and animal products were more commonly used in the local courts whereas sexual favours were common among female stud ents in the education sector.  Most participants stated that they mostly pay bribes when they encounter low level/field staff.  When asked who initiates a bribe, most participants said it was the giver and a minority said the receiver was responsible. As wit h the baseline, a popular view was that the receiver manipulates the giver into paying bribes indirectly by delaying or refusing to provide services. However, people also said that was the desperation of the giver and the unwillingness and impatience to w ait to access a service that motivates citizens to initiate a bribe. What came out clearly was that participants felt that both parties were ultimately responsible for the prevalence of bribery in Sierra Leone. Services people pay bribes for in the 6 foc us sectors The following are the most common services people pay bribes for in the 6 focus sector  Health sector - medical attention/consultation, faster service, visiting patients past visiting hours, use of the hospital toilet, buying quality drugs, birt h certificates and under 5 cards for new - borns, timely test results, use of ambulances in emergencies, discharge fees for new - borns (prices vary by location but girls are more expensive than boys).  Education sector - Admission, practical tests, promotion /grade/results, school supplies such as books and pens, school feeding, and collection of report cards after exams. Another common form of bribery that emerged was child labour/farming where children work on the teacher’s farm in return for good grades.  Justice sector – Favourable outcomes for pending cases, causing delays and/or adjournments, bail, bringing up (or losing) of files from earlier cases, and prisoner feeding.  Law enforcement/Police – Bail, “booking” (granting access to the road for bikes an d vehicles), avoiding of traffic offense and faulty vehicle charges, admitting a complainant’s statement, and issuing a warrant for a defendant.  Power sector – meter and/poles for connections, illegal direct connections, positioning of street lights close t o people’s houses or in compounds.  Water Sector – well maintenance, water connections, illegal connections to the mains pipes. Citizen’s confidence in refusing to pay a bribe  When asked what participants think would happen if people refused/stopped payin g bribes, most said that services would be delayed and people would get frustrated because bribery is embedded in the society. Participants all agreed that the country would prosper eventually. Changes in behaviour and attitude of public officials  Parti cipants expressed the view that the behaviour of service providers in the 5 sectors over the last few months had changed. For example, the police have become more discreet in taking a bribe. They use middlemen and other means such as Airtel money transfer and cash boxes at corners. Drivers also hide the money inside documents when they are asked to present them.

28. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Increase /decrease of bribery over the past year  A majority of participants thought that bribery had increased over the past year. Most of them stated that there was an apparent lack of any obvious punishment for offenders. 9 Citizen’s confidence in government’s action on corruption reports across PNB sectors .  Just under half of the respondents were confident that government would take action on reports of corruption. However, most think that any action would be minimal. They state that they haven’t observed any positive changes to date in the behaviour of public officials.  Of t he PNB sectors, participants stated that government would be most likely to acts on reports relating to the health sector, followed by the education sector. Additionally, the majority of participants said that they found that low/frontline level staff took bribes more than senior/high level officials. Additional Information Frequency with which people experience/encounter bribery  The majority of participants stated that bribery was a daily occurrence, almost every time they undertook a transaction. They s tated that the most common means of exchange with bribes is cash , with food and animal products and sexual favours following. As in other districts, people stated that food and animal products were commonly used in the local courts whereas sexual favours w ere more common with female students in the education sector. Services people pay bribes for in the 6 focus sectors  The following are the services people had to pay bribes for in the 6 focus sectors: o Health sector - Consultation, medicines, jumping queu es, obtaining good quality drugs, timely test results, use of ambulances in emergencies, obtaining of birth certificates and under 5 cards for infants, discharge fee for new - borns, (SLL30,000 for boys and 50,000 for girls in some areas), and payment for su pposedly free healthcare and nutritional supplies. o Education sector - Admission, practicals, promotion/grades/results, school supplies such as books and pens, school feeding, to enrol in the NASSIT payroll for teachers, and to collect report cards after exams o Justice sector – Favourable outcome for pending cases, delay/adjournment, granting of bail, to bring up files and/or documents from earlier cases, and prisoner feeding. o Police/Law enforcement – granting of bail, “booking” (granting access to the road for bikes and vehicles), avoidance of traffic offences and faulty vehicle charges, admitting a complainant’s statement, and issuing a warrant for a defendant. o Power sector – obtaining meters and/or poles for connection, establishing direct (illegal) conne ctions, positioning of street lights close to houses or in compounds. o Water Sector – Water connection, illegal reconnection to the main pipes. 9 Note that in the end - of - pilot survey there were more FGD participants who thought that bribery had decreased

3. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Abbreviations and Acron yms ACC Anti - Corruption Commission CSOs Civil Society Organization CSW Commercial Sex W orker DFID Department for International Development EAs E numeration A reas FGDs Focus Group Discussions FHC Free Health Care GoSL Government of Sierra Leone MDAs Ministries, Departments and Agencies PHU Peripheral Health Unit PNB Pay No Bribe PPPS Probability Proportionate to Population Size U5 Under - Five

52. Annex 4: End of Pilot Analysis of Corruption in Sierra Leone Pay No Bribe (PNB) Surveys Key Informant Interview Notes (In - Depth Interviews with Officials from Public Sector Institutions) Key informant interviews (KIIs) can generate both qualitative and quantitative data. This will attempt to capture both for this study. They constitute in - depth interviews with people who know what is going on in the community. The purpose of key informant inte rviews is to collect information from a wide range of people — including community leaders, professionals, or residents — who have first hand knowledge about issues in the community. These community ‘experts’, with their particular knowledge and understanding of the issue(s), can provide insight on the nature of problems and give recommendations for solutions (where necessary). The following are two common techniques used to conduct key informant interviews:  • Telephone Interviews  • Face - to - Face Interviews For the purpose of this study, face - to - face interviews will be adopted. KIIs are done to get information about pressing issues or problems in the community from a limited number of well - connected and informed community experts via in - depth and probing qu estions. Individual discussions create a comfortable environment where individuals can have a frank, open and in - depth discussion to get more candid or in - depth answers to sensitive topics which group dynamic may prohibit you from candidly discussing. Some times the group dynamic can prevent some participants from voicing their true opinions about sensitive topics. For this study, the key topics/questions involved for the qualitative data collection are as follows: (It is important to emphasise that this w ill be anonymous. People will not be identified, nor will the geographical area). Region District Community/Village EA No Residence: Is the EA rural or urban? Rural 1 Urban 2 Interview time (GMT) Start time (hh:mm) End time (hh:mm)

37. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 30 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Reason: If second call - back was unsuccessful, what is the main reason for that? Yes No Refused to be interviewed 1 2 Person selected was never at home after at least two visits 1 2 Household/Premise empty for the survey period after at least two visits 1 2 Respondent deaf/dump 1 2 Did not fit gender quota 1 2 No adults aged 18 years & above in household 1 2 If there no next household in the house after two visits to substitute, follow the procedure above to substitute household in another house. When you find a household with someone home, introduce yourself as indicated below. Introduction & Informed Consent Good day. My name is ____________. I am from ITASCAP, an independent research organization. I do not represent the government or any political party. We are studying the views of citizens in Sierra Leone about bribery and corruption. We would like to discuss these issues with a member of your household. Every person in your community has an equal chance of being included in this study. Your household has been chosen by chance. All information will be kept confidential. We would like to choos e an adult from your household. Consent given? Yes ---------- 1 No ---------- 2 If consent is given, then start the interview. Otherwise, substitute the household with the next household? Enumerator: Select appropriate code for Region/Province. Write names for District and Town/Village and EA number in the boxes.] Region District Eastern Region 1 Chiefdom Northern Region 2 Section Southern Region 3 Town/Village Western Area 4 EA Number Residence: Is the EA rural or urban? Rural 1 Urban 2 Interview time (GMT) Start time (hh:mm) End time (hh:mm) Enumerator Name Date interview completed: dd/mm/yyyy

61. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 48 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 5: Analysis of Corruption in Sierra Leone Pay No Bribe (PNB) Surveys Key Informant Interview Notes (In - Depth Interviews with Officials from Public Sector Institutions) Key informant interviews (KIIs) can generate both qualitative and quantitative data. This will attempt to capture both for this study. They constitute in - depth interviews with people who know what is going on in the community. The purpose of key informant interviews is to collect information from a wide range of people — including community leaders, professionals, or residents — who have firsthand knowledge about issues in the community. These community ‘experts’, with their particular knowledge and understandi ng of the issue(s), can provide insight on the nature of problems and give recommendations for solutions (where necessary). The following are two common techniques used to conduct key informant interviews :  Telephone Interviews  Face - to - Face Interviews For the purpose of this study, face - to - face interviews will be adopted. KIIs are done to get information about pressing issues or problems in the community from a limited number of well - connected and informed community experts via in - depth and probing que stions. Individual discussions create a comfortable environment where individuals can have a frank, open and in - depth discussion to get more candid or in - depth answers to sensitive topics which group dynamic may prohibit you from candidly discussing. Somet imes the group dynamic can prevent some participants from voicing their true opinions about sensitive topics. For this study, the key topics/questions involved for the qualitative data collection are as follows: (It is important to emphasise that this wi ll be anonymous. People will not be identified, nor will the geographical area). Region District Community/Village EA No Residence: Is the EA rural or urban? Rural 1 Urban 2 Interview time (GMT) Start time (hh:mm) End time (hh:mm)

70. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 57 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex 6: Analysis of Corruption in Sierra Leone Pay No Bribe (PNB) Surveys Target Sectors and Discussion Points for Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) Introduction The core of the pay no bribe (PNB) baseline focus group discussions (FGDs) is to assess, from the perspective of citizens, the indicators of quality service delivery; and to mine into a greater depth, details on aspects of particular interest. It will cove r the quality of service delivery in the Police ; Health – treatment at local health centres including hospitals and peripheral health units; Education – school placement; Power – electricity supply; and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sectors. Overall , twelve (12) FGDs will be conducted – two (2) in all four (4) pilot and two (2) in control districts. REGION: COMMUNITY/VILLAGE: DISTRICT: EA NUMBER: The FGDs will be guided by and will cover issues around: 1. Citizens’ awareness, knowledge and definition of bribery; Q . a. In your opinion, what is a bribe / bribery? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- ------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------- -------------------------------- 2. Assessment of perceptions of bribery among different groups of citizens ( male/female; young/old; urban/rural; rich/poor ); Q.a. What do you think about paying bribe? Totally Acceptable/Right ------------------------- 1 Fairly Tolerable ------------------------------------- 2 Totally Unacceptable/wrong ------------------- -- 3 b. Who do you think initiates bribery/paying a bribe? Giver/People -------------------------------------------- 1 Recipient/Service Provider --------------------------- 2 c. In your opinion, who do you think can stop the payment of bribes? Citizens/People ------------------------------------- 1 Service Providers ----------------------------------- 2 National Authorities/Government ----------------------------------------- 3

15. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Figure 7.1: Percent Respondents’ Payments of Bribes to the Judiciary (Courts) in the Last 6 Months by Study District (Respondents were asked: In the last 6 months, have you had to pay a bribe to the jud iciary (courts)? Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline Surveys) The end - of - pilot and baseline study results show, from figure 7, that a vast majority ( 76.6% ) of sample respondents submitted they ‘Haven’t been in Court’ and therefore haven’t had to pay bribes. However, a slight majority ( 11.7% ) of respondents who submitted valid ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ responses admitted paying a bribe to the judiciary/court when they sought justice while 11.3% said they did not pay bribe under the same circumstance. As se en in figure 7.1, Kenema seems to be an outlier in the responses to paying bribes to the judiciary. Further insights are detailed in the FGDs analysis section. Additional question from PDT/MCCU, baseline to be calculated from the Afrobarometer 2014/15 s urvey by district and by MDA – Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past year KENEMA BOMBALI BO WESTERN AREA BONTHE KOINADUGU PILOT DISTRICTS CONTROL DISTRICTS Yes 90 18 24 21 39 27 No 6 82 76 79 57 73 Can't remember 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % Percent by District of Respondents Who Have Had to Pay a Bribe to the Judiciary (Courts) in the Last 6 Months Yes No Can't remember

12. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Figure 4.1: Percent Citizens’ Knowledge of (Describing) One/More Ways of Reporting a Bribe by Study District (Respondents were asked: According to the “Pay No Bribe” initiative, describe the different ways of reporting a bribe? ) Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; PNB.2016 Baseline Surveys Figure 4 shows that citizens’ knowledge of describing at least one way of reporting a bribe has increased significantly between the baseline and end - of - pilot period (in pilot dis tricts, 58% in 2017 up from 26.5% in 2016, and across all districts 38.8% in 2017 as opposed to 21% in 2016). This would indicate that citizens have listened to and understood PNB messages over the period. Output Indicator 4.1a - Number/percentage of citi zens claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months Figure 5: Summary Respondents’ Information on Anti - Corruption in the Previous 3 Months 29 83 35 41 8 46 34 62 10 27 28 20 []% []% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Kenema Bombali Bo Western Area Bonthe Koinadugu Percent Pilot districts Control districts Number/Percent Percent of Citizens Who Can Describe At Least One Way of Reporting a Bribe by District

7. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 4 End - Of - Pilot and New Baseline Data Analysis: Results and Discussions Household Survey Findings and Discussions Table 1: PNB.2017 Indicators Matrix for Household Survey Data A nalyses for Reporting ID. Objective Indicator Indicator Specification Question Nmbr. Data Source a. Outcome Indicator 1 Number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing (government mistakes and corruption) C 5 Survey b. Outcome Indicator 3 Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference to corruption C8 ’’ c. Output Indicator 1.3 Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bri be via the website, call centre or app B3.1ABCD ’’ d. Output Indicator 2.3 Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe B3 ’’ e. Output Indicator 4.1a Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months C3 ’’ f. Output Indicator 4.1b Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months C6 ’’ g. To establish a 2017 figure Number/percentage of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months B10 ’’ h. Additional question from PDT/MCCU, baseline to be calculated from the Afrobarometer 2014/15 survey by district and by MDA Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past year C9 ’’ i. Additional question, no baseline yet Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors C10 ’’

34. PAY NO BRIBE / BASELINE SURVEY 27 Allocation of sample is given below : Allocation of sample households and EAs District Estimated # households Proportion of households Estimated sample households Adjusted Estimated sample households Sample EAs Pilot Districts Kenema 112,676 0.225544164 108.2611985 110 11 Bombali 92,195 0.184547234 88.58267244 90 9 Bo 105,725 0.211630309 101.5825483 100 10 Freetown 188,978 0.378278293 181.5735807 180 18 Total 499,574 1 480 480 48 Control Districts Koinadugu 73,833 0.6348987 304.7514 300/150* 30/15* Bonthe 42,458 0.3651013 175.2486 180/090* 18/09* Total 116,291 1 480 960 /240* 96 /24* * adjusted numbers  Recruitment and Training of Data Collectors (Enumerators & Supervisors) Twelve ( 12 ) enumerators and six ( 6 ) supervisor s was re cruit ed to collect data for the e nd line survey. The data collectors were trained for 3 days on the administration of the survey instruments/questionnaires and general survey protocols in order to equip them collect the appropriate and quality data. Pre - test of Survey Tool s Following the training of data collectors, the survey tool s (ques tionnaires) were pretested in one (1) day before finally adopted for actual fieldwork/data collection. The essence of pre - testing the questionnaires is to test the appropriateness of the questionnaires for use in collecting the end line data. Data Collect ion Methods Data collection l ast ed for a period of t en ( 10 ) days. The data collector s will work as a team to collect the e nd line data ; 2 enumerators and 1 supervisor per district . The enumerators administer ed household and key informant interview questionnaire s . The supervisor le d the enume rators in the fieldwork, oversaw the work of the enumerators and edit ed /check ed all completed questionnaires to ensure quality of data collected. In addition , the supervisor facilitate d the focus group discussion s while the Consultant s provide d overall oversight and coordination of the data collection exercise. Data Quality Assurance Data quality was guaranteed at all levels of the end line design and implementation. At the design stage, it was ensured that q ualif ied and experienced personnel ar e recruited to serve as enumerators and supervisor s . The questionnaires were well - structured to be able to capture all relevant data for end line survey. Thorough instructions were provided during training sessions to enable data collectors (enumerators and supervisor)

13. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Figure 5.1: Percent Respondents’ Information on Anti - Corruption in t he Previous 3 Months by Study District (Respondents were asked: Have you listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months? ) Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; PNB.2016 Baseline Surveys Comparatively, according to figures 5 and 5.1, the end - of - pilot study reveals that more citizens in pilot districts claim to have listened to/heard information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months (87.5% in 2017 as opposed to 73.25% in 2016). When control districts are inclu ded, the increase is much reduced (53% in 2017 vs 48.9% in 2016) which is to be expected. It is encouraging that citizens are reading and listening to more information about corruption, even if they are less clear about the effectiveness of the media in r evealing government mistakes and corruption (see Figure 1 above). Output Indicator 4.1b - Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months Figure 6: Summary Respondents Discuss of Corruption - Family/Friends - Last 3 Months 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Kenema Bombali Bo Western Area Bonthe Koinadugu Pilot districts Control districts Yes 89 96 55 92 80 88 69 74 49 80 57 68 No 11 5 45 8 20 12 31 26 51 20 43 32 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 % Percent Respondents Who Claim to Have Listened/Heard/Read Information on Anti - Corruption in the Previous 3 Months Yes No

17. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors Figure 9: Res pondents’ Confidence in Government Action on Corruption Reports Figure 9.1: Percent Respondents’ Confidence in Government Action on Corruption Reports by Study District (Respondents were asked: In your opinion, do you think the Government (of Sierra Leone) will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors? Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline From figure 9 , the study shows that a significant proportion of respondents (38.7%) are confident that Government will act on corruptio n reports in various sectors. From alternative data collected (from FGDs) in this study, this may Yes No Don't know/Can't tell Frequency 278 87 354 Percent 38.7 12.1 49.2 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Number/Percent Respondents' Confidence in Government Action on Corruption Reports Frequency Percent KENEMA BOMBALI BO WESTERN AREA BONTHE KOINADUGU PILOT DISTRICTS CONTROL DISTRICTS Yes 65 32 48 29 33 21 No 1 4 7 26 13 10 Don't know/Can't tell 35 64 45 45 53 69 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Percent by District of Citizens' Confidence in Government Action on Corruption Reports in the Various Sectors Yes No Don't know/Can't tell

9. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 2017). When further investigated through the FGDs, participants revealed that they feel that the new s media talk about bribery and corruption often, but follow up on issues raised is lacking and there is little news on progress with investigations and (where applicable) indictments. This leaves citizens struggling as to how to assess the news media in re lation to effectiveness. FGD participants were generally more positive in the control districts (Bonthe and Koinadugu), but this could be attributed to the fact that there is limited media availability in these areas and citizens are more likely to be cont ent with whatever news or anti - bribery programs they receive. Outcome Indicator 3 - Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference in tackling corruption. Figure 2: Summary Citizens’ Confidence in Fighting Corruption Figu re 2.1: Percent Citizens’ Confidence in Fighting Corruption by Study District (Respondents were asked: As a citizen do you think you can make a difference in tackling corruption?) Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; Afrobarometer round 6 S urveys 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Kenema Bombali Bo Western Area Bonthe Koinadugu Pilot districts Control districts Yes 18 70 42 60 19 50 48 50 32 37 61 35 No 32 9 40 0 61 14 41 7 55 11 32 3 Don’t Know 50 21 19 40 20 36 11 44 13 52 7 61 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Percent Citizens' Confidence in Fighting Corruption by District Yes No Don’t Know

2. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY i Contents Abbreviations and Acronyms Executive Summary 1 Introduction 2 End - Of - Pilot and New Baseline Surveys Methodologies 3 End - Of - Pilot and New Baseline Data Analysis: Results and Discussions 4 New Baseline 24 Annex 1 25 Annex 2 29 Annex 3 42 Annex 4 4 5 Annex 5 4 8 Annex 6 54 Annex 7 6 4

36. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 29 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Annex Two: End of Pilot Analysis of Corruption in Sierra Leone 2017 Household Survey Questionnaire Household/Respondent Selection Procedure Enumerator : It is your job to select at random 10 households in every EA for interview. A household is a group of people who live together as an entity, eat from the same pot and recognise one person as the head by all members Start your walk pattern in survey community from the start point that has been randomly chosen by your Field Supervisor. Team members must walk in opposite directions to each other along a line identified and agreed by the members through spinning of a pen. Use a 5 interval pattern to se lect a household in the EA. If the EA comprises of 2 or more communities, randomly choose one community to select the households. Walking in your designated directions away from the start point, select the 5 th house counting houses on both the right and t he left along the line and choose a household for the first interview. Once you complete the first interview, continue on in the same direction with subsequent houses selecting the 10 th house to select second household, again counting houses on both the right and the left. Continue with the 15 th , 20 th , etc until you acquire the required sample. If the settlement comes to an end and there are no more houses, turn at right angles to the right and keep walking, continuing to count in the interval. If th ere are 2 or more households in a house selected, choose one household at random from the list of all households present or temporarily absent. If a household selected is absent at the moment for interview, schedule a call when the household has return. You can make up to 2 calls. If the 2 nd call is unsuccessful, you can substitute the household noting reason for the substitution accordingly. Alternate your interview with adult male and adult female respondents aged 18 years and above . That is, if the first respondent in household selected is a male, interview a female respondent in the second household selected and so on. Instruction Circle the code(s) that correspond to response option(s) of the respondent Call - back: Second call made for the first household selected? If no call - back is made, introduce yourself as indicated below and start interview. Yes 1 No 2 Progress of call - back: If there is a second call, is it successful? If second call is successful ( 1 ), introduce yourself as indicated below and start interview. If second call is unsuccessful (2) , ask the main reason for that. Yes 1 No 2

14. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Figure 6.1: Percent Respondents’ Discussion of Corruption with Family/Friends in the Last 3 Months by Study District (Respondents were asked: In the last 3 months, have you had a discussion about corruption with your family/friends? ) Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; PNB.2016 Baseline Surveys Figures 6 and 6.1 show that a slightly larger proportion of people in pilot districts claimed to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 month s (35.75% in 2017 as opposed to 31.5% in 2016). In control districts, Koinadugu registered a 10% increase on 2016 (to 27%) whereas Bonthe remained about the same. When asked in the FGDs about corruption discussions with friends and family, many participant s claimed that they were tired of discussing the same issues when nothing much changes. To Establish a Baseline for 2017 - Number/percentage of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months Figure 7: Respondents’ Payments of Bribes to the Judiciary (Courts) in the Last 6 Months 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Kenema Bombali Bo Western Area Bonthe Koinadugu Pilot districts Control districts Yes 22 61 45 20 29 41 30 21 17 16 17 27 No 78 39 55 80 71 59 70 79 83 84 83 73 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 % Percent by District of Respondents Who Have Had a Discussion About Corruption with a Family Member/Friend in the Last 3 Months Yes No Yes No Can't remember Haven't been to Court Frequency 84 81 3 551 Percent 11.7 11.3 .4 76.6 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Number/Percent Payment of Bribe to the Judiciary (Courts) in the Last 6 Months Frequency Percent

8. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Outcome Indicator 1 - Number an d percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing (government mistakes and corruption) Figure 1: Summary Effectiveness of the News Media in Revealing Government Mistakes and Corruption Figure 1 .1 : Percent Effectiveness of the News Media in Revealing Government Mistakes and Corruption by Study District (Respondents were asked: How effective do you think are the news media in revealing Government mistakes and corruption?) Source : PN B.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; Afrobarometer round 6 Surveys From figure 1 , the overall picture of ‘news media effectiveness in revealing Government mistakes and corruption’ is ‘ ineffective ’ by both baseline and end - of - pilot standard, although in i n pilot areas there has been a very slight increase in the percentage of citizens finding the news media ‘ somehow effective ’ (from 43% in 2016 to 45.25% in 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Kenema Bombali Bo Western Area Bonthe Koinadugu Pilot districts Control districts Very Effective 2 5 6 2 10 8 13 0 0 3 5 19 Somehow effective 23 56 33 42 68 37 48 46 49 37 11 20 Not Effective at all 12 8 34 19 14 22 33 27 29 11 48 4 Don't Know 63 30 27 37 8 33 5 26 23 49 36 57 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Percent Effectiveness of the news media to reveal government mistakes and corruption by Study District Very Effective Somehow effective Not Effective at all Don't Know

39. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 32 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Respondent Selection Please tell me the names of all adult males/females separately who presently live in this household. I only want the names of males/females who are citizens of Sierra Leone and who are 18 years and older. If this interview must be with a female, list only women’s names. If this interview is with a male, list only men’s names. List all eligible household members of this gender who are 18 years or older, even those not presently at home but who will return to the house at any time that day. Include on ly citizens of Sierra Leone. Women's Names Men's Names 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 Total number of adult citizens (males/females) in the household |____|____| Enumerator: Choose the number of person to interview at random using a simple ballot system and note the name of person chosen. Section A: Respondent Information A1. Name of Respondent ______________________________________ _____________________ A2. Respondent's gender Male ------------- 1 Female ------------- 2 A3. How old are you? Record age in completed years as at last birthday |_____|_____| A4 . Respondent highest level of education. Don’t read option None 1 Primary 2 Secondary school 3 Post - Secondary 4 Higher Education (University) 5 Others (specify) _______________________________________________________ 6 A5. Are you currently engaged in any economic activity (including any form of employment) that earns you income? If No, Go to Section B Yes 1 No 2

16. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Figure 8: Summary Respondents’ Perception of the Level of Corruption in the Past Year Figure 8.1: Percent Respondents ’ Perception on the Level of Corruption in the Past Year by Study District (Respondents were asked: In your opinion, over the past year, has the level of corruption in this country increased, decreased, or stayed the same? Source : PNB.2017 End - of - pilot and New Baseline; Afrobarometer round 6 Surveys) From the end - of - pilot survey, similar percentages of respondents across pilot and control districts think that ‘corruption has increased a lot’ over the past year (69% in 2017 as opposed to 70% in the Afrob arometer countrywide survey in 2015). However, in pilot areas there appear to have been some positive shifts: the percentage of respondents saying that they thought that corruption had ‘increased a lot’ fell to 62.25%, compared with 71.75% in 2015. Simila rly, 13.75% of respondents in pilot districts felt that corruption had ‘decreased a lot’ over the year, compared with only 4.75% in 2015, and 20.5% felt that corruption levels had ‘stayed the same’ (compared with 11.25% in 2015). Overall the most significa nt progress seems to have been achieved in Kenema and Bombali pilot districts. Additional question, no baseline yet – 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 2015 2017 KENEMA BOMBALI BO WESTERN AREA BONTHE KOINADUGU PILOT DISTRICTS CONTROL DISTRICTS Increased a lot 55 39 70 41 83 85 79 84 90 81 74 72 Stayed the same 10 40 12 31 13 5 10 6 3 12 7 9 Decreased a lot 2 19 7 23 2 5 7 8 7 6 8 13 Don't know 33 2 12 4 3 5 4 1 0 1 11 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % Percent Citizens' Perception, by Study District on the Level of Corruption in the Country Over the Past Year(s) Increased a lot Stayed the same Decreased a lot Don't know

40. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 33 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 A6. Which form of economic activity are you currently engaged in? Formal (Salary/wage worker) 1 Informal (Petty trading, farming, gardening, animal rearing, poultry, etc) 2 Skilled Worker (e.g. Mason, Carpentry, Mechanic, driver, etc) 3 A7 . How much do you earn per month? SLL:_________________________________________ Section B: Knowledge about “Pay No Bribe” (PNB) and Practices B1. Have you heard about “Pay No Bribe” initiative of the Anti - Corruption Commission? If No, Go to B4 Yes 1 No 2 B1.2 If Yes, how/from whom? Civil Society (CSO) 1 Government/ACC/Other 2 B2. What is the “Pay No Bribe” initiative of the Anti - Corruption Commission (ACC) about? Enumerator: Do not read the script to respondent. Listen to the respondent description and indicate whether his/her description is consistent with the script (i.e. correct or not). “The PNB is an innovative reporting mechanism for citizens to anonymously report inci dents of petty corruption and bribery” Correct 1 Not correct 2 B3 . According to the “Pay No Bribe” initiative, describe the different ways of reporting a bribe? Don’t read option . Choose all that apply Calling a hotline phone number (515) 1 By email/website/PNB App 2 In person - to ACC, Govt. MDA, through Civil Society Organization (CSO) partner organization, Police, Local Authority, etc. 3 Don’t know/Cannot tell 4 B3.1 How easy do you think it is for ordinary citizens to report incidence of bribe via: PNB website Very easy 1 Somehow easy 2 Not easy at all 3 Very easy 1

48. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 41 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 ( Enumerator ) Please probe category of media ; ( eg. Radio, Newspaper, Television , etc.) Somehow effective 2 Not effective at all 3 C6. In the last 3 months, have you had a discussion about corruption with your family/friends? If No, Go to C7 Yes 1 No 2 C7. If Yes, What did you discuss?  i. _____________________________________________________________________________ ii. _____________________________________________________________________________ iii. ___________________________________________________________________ __________ iv. _____________________________________________________________________________ C8. As a citizen do you think you can make a difference in tackling corruption? Yes 1 No 2 Don’t Know/Can’t tell 3 C9. In your opinion, over the past year, has the level of corruption in this Country increased, decreased, or stayed the same? (Enumerator) Probe for magnitude. Increased a lot 1 Increased somewhat 2 Stayed the same 3 Decreased a lot 4 Decreased somewhat 5 Don’t Know 6 C10. In your opinion, do you think the Government (of Sierra Leone) will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors? Yes 1 No 2 Don’t Know/Can’t tell 3 Thank the respondent for his/her time and participation

46. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 39 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Each time you need assistance ---------- 1 A few times ----------------------------------- 2 Seldom ------------------------------------- 3 B10. In the last 6 months, have you had to pay a bribe to the Judiciary (Courts)? Yes 1 No 2 Don’t know/ Can’t remember 3 B10.1 If yes, to whom? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B10.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock ---------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B10.2 How much did you have to pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 B10.3 For which service did you h ave to pay? To see the Judge/Magistrate/Court Chairman ---------- 1 For Bail -------------- 2 For your case to be called up/heard ------- 3 Other (Specify)................................. B10.4 In your opinio n, how often do you have to pay a bribe in the judiciary in order to get justice? Each time you seek justice ---------- 1 A few times ----------------------------- 2

47. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 40 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Seldom ---------------------------- --- 3 B11. If needed, where would you seek justice? With the Courts ------------------------------------- 1 The Police ------------------------------------------- 2 Anti - Corruption Commission (ACC) --------- 3 Civil Society Organisations ---------------- 4 Traditional Leaders -------------------------- 5 Religious Leaders ---------------------------- 6 Other (Specify)................................... Section C: K nowledge about Anti - Corruption Commission (ACC) C1. Do you know about the Anti - Corruption Commission ( ACC) work on grand corruption? If No, End Interview Yes 1 No 2 C2. Please describe the Anti - Corruption Commission initiatives. Don’t read option. Choose ALL that apply Tackle corruption 1 Accept the need for transparency, accountability 2 Prosecute corrupt practices 3 Enhance a corrupt free society 4 C3. H ave you listened to/heard/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months? If No, Go to C5 Yes 1 No 2 C4. Where did you listen to/read information on anti - corruption? Don’t read option. Choose ALL that apply PNB website 1 News papers 2 Radio 3 ACC education and publicity campaigns. 4 Word of mouth 5 Other (Specify)... 9 C5. How effective do you think are the news media in revealing Government mistakes and corruption? Very Effective 1

41. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 34 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 PNB call center Somehow easy 2 Not easy at all 3 PNB App Very easy 1 Somehow easy 2 Not easy at all 3 In Person Very easy 1 Somehow easy 2 Not easy at all 3 B4. In the past 12 months did you pay extra cost(s) to school officials for your children in school? If No or NA, Go to B5 Yes 1 No 2 NA, no one attended school 3 B4.1 If yes, how much did you pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 --------------- -- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 -------- 4 B4.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock ---------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B4.2 To whom did you pay? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B4.3 For which service did you pay? Enrolment / Placement -------------------------- 1 Practicals ---------------------- 4

43. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 36 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Postnatal service (for lactating mothers) ------- 3 Other (Specify)................................. ....... B5.4 In your opinion, how o ften do you have to pay a bribe in order to get health car / services? Each time you seek health care ---------- 1 A few times ----------------------------------- 2 Seldom ----------------------------- -------- 3 B6. In the past 12 months did you pay extra for electricity related services to an EDSA / NPA Staff? If No or NA, Go to B7 Yes 1 No 2 NA, not connected 3 B6.1 If yes, how much did you pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 --- ----- 4 B6.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock -------------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B6.2 To whom did you pay? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B6.3 For which service did you pay? New Connection -------------------------- 1 Reconnection ----------------------------- 2 Meter Installation ----------------------- 3 To avoid bills --------------------------- 4 Other (Specify)................................. B6.4 In your opinion, how ofte n do you have to pay a bribe in order to get electricity services? Each time you need electricity services ---------- 1

42. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 35 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Grades ---------------------------------------------- 2 Art and Craft/Handwork ---------------- 5 Report Card ------------------------------------ 3 Seat (Bench/Chair/Desk) --------- 6 Other (Specify)................................. B4.4 In your opinion, how often do you have to pay a bribe in order to get education services? Each time you need the service ---------- 1 A few times ----------------------------- 2 Seldom ------------------------------- 3 B5 . In the past 12 months did you pay extra costs for any services for you or any member of yo ur household/family to a health worker in a health facility? If No or NA, Go to B6 Yes 1 No 2 NA, no one attended clinic 3 B5.1 If yes, how much did you pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 -------- 4 B5.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock ---------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B5.2 To whom did you pay? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B5.3 For which service did you pay? Under five health care -------------------------------- 1 Consultation ------------------------------------------- ---- 4 Antenatal service (for pregnant women) -------- 2 Treatment/Medication (Other than 1,2,or 3) --- ---- 5

44. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 37 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 A few times --------------------------------------------- 2 Seldom -------------- -------------------------------- 3 B7. What is the main source of water for your household? Tap/pipe borne ---------------- 1 Ordinary well ------------------- 3 Hand pump well ------- -------- 2 River/Stream ------------------- 4 Other (Specify) ----------------- B8. In the past 12 months did you pay extra to get water services to a government officials or water company or service provider? If No or NA, Go to B9 Yes 1 No 2 NA, not connected 3 B8.1 If yes, how much did you pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 ------------ 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 ---------- 4 B8.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock -------------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B8.2 To whom did you pay? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B8.3 For which service did you pay? New Connection -------------------------- 1 Reconnection ----------------------------- 2 Pipe Installation ----------------------- 3 To avoid bills -------------------------- 4 Other (Specify)................................. B8.4 In your opinion, how often do you have to pay a bribe in order to get water services?

20. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Number and percentage of citizens thinking they could make a difference to corruption The belief of ordinary people to make difference in fighting corruption was partly determined by effectiveness of report ing of government mistakes and corruption in the media. About two thirds of FGD participants are confident that citizens reporting bribery will make a difference Respondents believed that they could make a difference to corruption if there was increased t ransparency and communication to the people though the media Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have discussed corruption with family/friends in the last 3 months A majority of respondents in urban areas and just under half in rural areas claimed to have discussed corruption with friends and family in the previous 3 months and claimed that they discuss corruption more now than before. A large majority of FGD participants claimed to have discussed corruption with friends and family in the previous 3 months and that they discuss corruption more now than before. In the discussions, participants believed that corruption is more visible in everyday life, therefore, there is need to discuss it even more. The household survey indicates that some citizens are disillusioned by an apparent lack of action on cases Number/percentage of citizens who have paid a bribe to the judiciary in the last 6 months No baseline information available Almost all participants claimed to have knowledge of bribery in the judi ciary. Examples were given about cases where people had to pay bribe to influence outcome of cases. However, only a few actually claimed that they have paid a bribe themselves The judiciary was not included in the baseline/pilot project Number/percentage of citizens thinking that corruption has increased /decreased over the past year This question was not asked during the Baseline Survey, but FGD participants stated that petty corruption was evident across the sectors that PNB would focus on. 3 More FGD participants think that corruption has increased over the past year although a larger number than previously thought that it had stayed the same or decreased. People claimed that behaviours of public officials have changed on the outside but that they sti ll take bribes, albeit more surreptitiously. Even though more participants think bribery has increased, they believe that there is a chance for a decrease because attitudes and behaviour of public officials have changed. There is a greater fear of being c aught now, and in a few cases amounts asked for have reduced. Number/percentage of citizens thinking that the government will act on any reports on corruption in the various sectors No baseline information available Nearly three - quarters of FGD participan ts believe that government acts on reports received on bribery/corruption. Respondents are however concerned that the actions are slow and mostly do not target high level officials. 1.1 3 The Afrobarometer 2015/16 Surveys also states that more than 80% o f respondents said that corruption had ‘increased a lot’, ‘increased somewhat’, or ‘stayed the same’ .

45. PAY NO BRIBE END OF PILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY 38 COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Each time you need water services ---------- 1 A few times ---------------------------------------- 2 Seldom ----------------------------------------- 3 B9. In the past 12 months did you pay cost to a police officer in order to get the assistance/services you needed or to avoid a problem like passing a checkpoint or avoiding a fine or arrest or prosecution? If No or NA, Go to Section C Yes 1 No 2 B9.1 . If yes, how much did you pay? Less than Le5,000 -------------- 1 Le100,000 - Le500,000 ------------- 5 Le5,000 - Le20,000 -------------- 2 Le500,000 - Le1,000,000 ----------- 6 Le20,000 - Le50,000 --------- 3 Above Le1,000,000 ----------------- 7 Le50,000 - Le100,000 -------- 4 B9.1.2 If you did not pay cash money, in which form did you pay the bribe? Food/Livestock -------------- 1 Used Influence -------------- 2 Other (Specify)................................. B9.2 To whom did you pay? High level official 1 Middle level official 2 Low level/Junior official 3 B9.3 For which service did you pay? Driving without valid driver’s licence ---- 1 Drunk driving/drinking and driving --- 6 Overloading ------------------------------------ 2 Driving an unlicensed vehicle ---------- 7 Smooth tyres ------- ---------------------------- 3 Driving an uninsured vehicle ----------- 8 Over - speeding --------------------------------- 4 Wrong parking ----------------------------- 9 Faulty vehicle lights --------------------------- 5 Driving without a s eat - belt on --------- 10 Other (Specify) -------------------------------------------- B9.4 In your opinion, how often do you have to pay a bribe to the police in order to get assistance ?

19. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 Table 2: Summary FGD Comparison between Baseline 2016 and End - of - pilot 2017 by Indicators Indicator Baseline End - of - pilot Comments Number/percentage of citizens who can describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe (Output indicator 2.3) Slightly fewer than half of FGD participants could describe one or more ways of reporting a bribe FGD participants had a reasonable level of knowledge of bribery as it relates to corruption There was limited awareness of the ‘pay no bribe’ (PNB) drive am ong FGD participants in the study districts 2 ; Most FGD participants had a good knowledge of one or more ways of reporting a bribe. Rural participants were aware of the PNB campaign but knew less about ways of reporting a bribe. Most FGD attendees in pi lot districts are aware of and had knowledge of PNB Participants in the urban areas especially are more aware of ways of reporting a bribe and the PNB because of their proximity and access to information and related organizations. This is an improvement f rom the baseline FGDs Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the website, call centre or app (Output 1.3) No baseline information available – project piloted Only a few participants in FGDs in PNB target areas have experienced reporting a bribe via the website, call centre or app. Those that did claimed it was fairly easy Even though those who have reported a bribe claimed it was easy, they were worried about anonymity. These fears may also have led to under - reporting. Number and percentage of people thinking that the news media are effective in revealing government mistakes and corruption Just over half the FGD participants thought that the news media was effective in revealing government mistakes and corruption. Around three - quarters of FGD attendees stated that the news media were not effective in revealing government mistakes and corruption. The reasons for the lack of confidence in the news media’s effectiveness in re vealing corruption appear to be that citizens do not receive information on the outcomes of cases. Most participants claimed they hear about corruption issues on the radio regularly, but are rarely given details about results, especially in cases with top government officials. Number/percentage of citizens claiming to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the previous 3 months Nearly two - thirds of FGD participants claimed to have listened to/read information on anti - corruption in the prev ious 3 months A large majority of FGD participants claimed to be radio listeners and all of them said that they had listened to/read information on bribery/ corruption. We discovered that some participants do not listen to or have access to radios, which affects their ability to assess the news media. 2 This is to be expected as the programme had not been launched at that point.

10. P AY NO BRIBE END OF P ILOT & NEW BASELINE SURVEY COFFEY NOVEMBER 2017 By a large measure, Sierra Leoneans are much more confident now in their role as citizens in the fight to tackle corruption than in the past year(s). Comparatively, from figure 2 , 17.3% more ( 32.2% in 2015 vs 49.5% in 2017 ) citizens responded in th e affirmative when asked: ‘ As a citizen do you think you can make a difference in tackling corruption?’ Interestingly, all pilot districts registered an increase in citizens’ confidence along with Bonthe, a control district. Koinadugu was the only distri ct to register a fall. Output Indicator 1.3 - Number/percentage of citizens in PNB target areas who state that it is easy or fairly easy to report a bribe via the website, call centre or app Figure 3: How Easy or Difficult It Is To Report a Bribe via the Various PNB Means Figure 3.1: Percent Ease/Difficulty of Citizens Reporting a Bribe via the Various PNB Means by Study District Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent PNB website PNB Call Center (515) PNB App In person to ACC, Govt., MDA, etc. Very Easy 24 3 601 84 11 2 45 6 Somehow easy 47 7 93 13 58 8 655 91 Not easy at all 648 90 25 3 650 90 19 3 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Number/Percent Citizens' Ease/Difficulty in Reporting a Bribe Very Easy Somehow easy Not easy at all 3 44 9 3 1 64 0 17 6 97 1 2 7 95 0 6 1 98 12 0 93 0 5 30 51 49 95 2 18 0 79 3 2 1 96 3 4 1 93 0 2 86 2 6 1 91 67 5 42 2 97 18 100 4 91 1 98 2 89 1 99 2 99 0 2 98 1 99 4 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Website Call Centre App In Person Website Call Centre App In Person Website Call Centre App In Person Website Call Centre App In Person Website Call Centre App In Person Website Call Centre App In Person KENEMA BOMBALI BO WESTERN AREA BONTHE KOINADUGU PILOT DISTRICTS CONTROL DISTRICTS % Percent Ease/Difficulty of Citizens Reporting a Bribe via: PNB Website/Call Center/App/In Person; by District Very Easy Somehow Easy Not Easy At All

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Embeds 4

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