2018
Anti-Corruption Commission, Sierra Leone, we believe in communication, accountability and transparency.

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PNB-Learning-and-Sharing-Meeting-Makeni-2017

Pay No Bribe / Resources Publications

The second Pay No Bribe (PNB) partners’ Learning and Sharing meeting was held in Makeni on the 12th and 13th December 2017. The purpose of the meeting was to assess the progress of the PNB since the August 2017 Learning and Sharing meeting in Kenema, and to identify next steps.

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4. 4 Tables Table 1: Session 2, CARL's Presentation on Hub and Spoke visits ................................ ............. 6 Table 2: Session 2, CGG's Presentation on Monitoring of Facilities ................................ .......... 7 Table 3: Session 2, CGG's Pres entation on FGDs ................................ ................................ ....... 7 Table 4: Session 2, NMJD's Presentation on Community Meetings ................................ .......... 8 Table 5: Session 2, CARL's Presentation on Accountability Forums ................................ .......... 9 Table 6: Session 6, Mini ToC for MDA work ................................ ................................ ............. 14 Table 7, Session 6: Proposed Standard Operating Procedures ................................ ............... 14

1. 1 PNB Learning and Sharing Meeting Makeni, December 12 th and 13 th 2017

2. 2 Intro duction The second P ay N o B ribe (PNB) partners’ Learning and Sharing meeting was held at the MADAM Conference Hall, Makeni on the 12 th and 13 th December 2017. Purpose and Outputs The purpose o f the meeting was to assess the progress of the PNB since the August 2017 Learning and Sharing meeting in Kenema , and to identify next steps . The workshop report i d entifies the following achievements i) Clear understanding of and plan s for radio activities ii) Clarification of the balance of outreach activities iii) Enhanced understanding of how monitoring is carried out iv) Enhanced knowledge of MDA SOP agreements Attendees O fficials from the Anti Corruption Commission’s (ACC) national headquarters attended the meeting, with responsibilities for M inistries, D epartments and A gencie s (MDAs) and Public Education (PE). ACC PE officials f rom the Bo, Bombali , Kenema and Kono regional ACC offices also attended. The PNB coordinator and two animator representatives f rom each of the four PNB Civil Society Organisation partners were also present . These were : Campaign for Good Governance (CGG , responsible for Western Area Rural and Urban ); Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (CARL , respons ible for Bo ); Mankind Activities Development Accreditation Movement ( MADAM , responsible for Bombali ) and the Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD , responsible for Kenema and Kono ) . Coffey representatives comprised t he Interim Team Leader, th e Deputy Team Leader, the CSO Coordinato r and the Coffey Technical Adviser. The two - day programme was facilitated by the CSO Coordinator and the Coffey Deputy Team Leader .

12. 12 Discussions  Everyone commented o n the paucity of IEC materials. Billboards have be en approved and ACC stated that it expect ed to see them across all 16 districts soon. Coffey is also funding 6 Billboards.  ACC has spe nt SLL 50 million for IEC materials . Coffey has 100 million for period to M arch 20 18 and an additional SLL 100 million March to December 18. Coffey create d a chart in the workshop for all agencies to indicate quantities needed (see Annex es Three and Four ) . Radio Tracker – Presentation by Whitsun Whitsun stated that monitoring information h ighlighted the fact that most CSO radio program mes have been long panel discussions. Lynda r eminded audience that at Kenema CSOs agreed to develop short , lively programme s including voxpop s , jingles, endorsements, recorded street drama, recorded accountability meetings , interviews etc. She wondered if these ideas had be en lost and pointed out that this was the reason why Coffey agreed to bringing the radio journalist s into each CSO programme – to re cord events, edit and air. Whitsun re - emphasised the need to diversify radio p rogramming. In the discussion , it became clear that there was confusion amongst CSOs on role and purpose of radio journalists and that journalists have not been given clear guidelines from CSO Coordinators on what was expected from them. CSO s w ant ed to maintain the emphasis on radio discussion but agreed the need to diversify the programme content. Coffey stressed the fact that with just 120 minutes airtime available to each CSO per month it is not possible to focus only on long panel discussion s; numerous short airings in different formats are essential to reach ing different target audiences and maximum numbers . The role of the embedded radio journ alists is to do this. Radio journalists agreed to discuss further with the CSOs. Some activities were nevertheless reported by r adio journalists: - In Freetown , the journalist uses a CGG package in 3 main current affair programme tha t includes accountability meetings, SH meetings, endo rsement messages. He a lso has a 10 - minute file of an accountability forum in Tombo. - The Bo journalist reports through SLBC. He does interviews and plays them in his shows. He will share his recordings wi th Jeremy. - The Kenema journalist develops reports to popularise PNB and covers stories , meetings and e ndorsements. Additionally, he incorporate s jingles and endorsements in to his own programmes , including regular current affairs programmes . He has a 15 - minute audio file s of accountability forum s held in Shegbwema and Kenema. - All journalists confirmed that they record a range of outreach events. CSOs had heard about a PNB message of the week and wanted to know more about it. ACC explained that this refers to its ‘ Message of the Month ’ strategy. 1 Session Four, Action Points: Communications  Coffey will draft Guiding Principles f or each activity and share them with all PNB partners  Coffey to share revised J ob Description for radio journalists 1 Highlighted in the revised 2017 Communications Strategy and Operations Plan

14. 14  A New Strategy 2 focus ing on MDA Actions to change the narrative of the PNB (and the MDAs) from negative to positive , was presented and well received at the workshop .  The workshop ag reed the mini - Theory of Change for the PNB MDA component and basic Standard Operating Procedures for the MDA work (tables 6 and 7 below) . Table 6 : Session 6 , Mini ToC for MDA work Table 7 , Session 6: Proposed Standard Operating Procedures Further outputs of the workshop were :  Discussions on t he f unction and setup of IMC s 2 comprising a mini Toc and Standard Operating Procedures P N B p r o v i d e s d a t a t o M D A s M D A s m a k e i n f o r m e d d e c i s i o n m a k i n g t o t a c k l e b r i b e r y M D A s c a r r y o u t p o s i t i v e a c t i o n s t o t a c k l e b r i b e r y a n d c o r r u p t i o n T h e S e r v i c e D e l i v e r y i s i m p r o v e d P N B c o m m u n i c a t e s p o s i t i v e a c t i o n s a n d i m p r o v e m e n t t o t h e p u b l i c T h e P u b l i c s c o n f i d e n c e i n t h e M D A i n c r e a s e s P N B M D A T H E O R Y O F C H A N G E - I m p r o v e d a t a c o l l e c t i o n b a s e d o n M D A n e e d s - I m p r o v e M D A r e p o r t s a n d m a k e t h e m m o r e a c c e s s i b l e - A C C R e g i o n a l M a n a g e r w i l l e n g a g e w i t h M D A s o n a l o c a l l e v e l t o r e s p o n d t o t h e d a t a - I n c r e a s e d t e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t t o I M C s - R e f r e s h e r t r a i n i n g o f I M C s - ( L o g i s t i c a l s u p p o r t ) - M D A s w i l l t a k e a c t i o n o n N a t i o n a l a n d L o c a l l e v e l - P r o v i d e m o n i t o r i n g e x p e r t i s e f o l l o w u p a n d d o c u m e n t p r o g r e s s - L o c a l M D A s w i l l f e e d r e s p o n s e s t o I M C H Q T h e s u c c e s s s t o r i e s o f t h e M D A s w i l l b e c o m m u n i c a t e d v i a - T h e P N B / A C C w e b s i t e - P r e s s B r i e f i n g s - O u t r e a c h a n d P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n i n c l u d i n g : R a d i o , M e s s a g i n g , S o c i a l m e d i a a n d P N B A n i m a t o r s P N B S T R A T E G Y A C C f i n a l i s e m o n t h l y M D A r e p o r t M D A I M C H Q m e e t s t o d i s c u s s r e p o r t A C C R e g i o n a l M a n a g e r e n g a g e s M D A s a t d i s t r i c t l e v e l I M C H Q r e c i e v e s r e s p o n s e s a n d m e e t s t o f i n a l i s e c o l l a t e d r e s p o n s e 5 t h o f e v e r y m o n t h I M C a s k d e p a r t m e n t s w i t h i n M D A t o d r a f t r e s p o n s e s M D A s a t d i s t r i c t l e v e l d r a f t s r e s p o n s e s 5 - 1 0 t h o f e v e r y m o n t h 1 0 - 1 5 t h o f e v e r y m o n t h 2 0 t h o f e v e r y m o n t h A C C r e c e i v e s r e s p o n s e a n d s e n d s t o R e g i o n a l M a n a g e r s a n d C S O ’ s 2 5 t h o f e v e r y m o n t h C S O a n d A C C h o l d A c c o u n t a b i l i t y M e e t i n g s w i t h t h e M D A ’ s d i s c u s s i n g p r o m i s s e d r e s p o n s e s a n d a c t i o n s t a k e n P r o p o s e d S O P

11. 11 o Martin pointed out that lowest number of reports came from WA and Bombali – but that these areas had the most 515 reports. MADAM said that they focus outreach on Makeni and environs and believe that urban environment and good teleco networks lead to higher numbers of 515 calls. They encourage people to call direct and have started talking to different categories of people e.g. school children who use the app rather than 515. MADAM also said that there a re challenges to calling 515 and some people are reluctant to use it because they don’t want to talk direct ly to a person, and it take s more time. o Coffey c onfirmed that a key sustainability objective is citizen self - reporting through 515 or the mobile app. In WA and other urban centres where there are higher concentration s of smart phones and people are more tech savvy , CSO s should encourage self - reporting through the mobile app. o In relation to high levels of reporting in Kono, the team there said that they spen d 3 days out of five on P NB awareness r a ising and have strong collaboration with local radio stations. The team a greed that young people should be encouraged to use mobile app themselves , but pointed out that a f ocus on reports potentially undermines credibility : a lower number of reports doesn’t necessarily mean that a CSO isn’t working or that sensitisation isn’t happening. o CSOs said that the long series of question s at the call centre deters people. Also , the limited call - centre hours do not fit with people’s days . Martin inform ed the group that call centre hours to be extended to 8 pm Monday to Friday and 8 to 12 on Saturday – from 9 January. The app can be used around the clock. Mende and Temne language speakers have been recruited to the call - centre. o The g roup identified prank calls and bogus calls as an issue . Day One , Session Four: Communication Strategies ACC Communications Patrick outlined the Communications Operations Plan and described the communications methodologies that are now being used by ACC. He highlighted t he growing use of social media and gave the following contacts:  Facebook = PayNoBribeSL  Dr o p Box = PNBSL  Sound Cloud = PNBSL  You Tube = Pay No Bribe Sierra Leone The ACC is uploading ji ngles and radio programmes to these sites along with audio visual mate rial . The ACC have an audio file of a 30 - minute panel discussion with jingles and endorsements, and Patrick r equested that CSO s continue to take local endorsements and interesting stories and air them through local radio . The Comm unication s Op eration s Plan contains 13 production items to be aired between November and March. CARL commented that would like to see ACC programming moved forward in earnest , and P atrick assured him that it w ould b e. ACC Funds have been approved and sent to regional offices for ou treach a nd sensitisation activity .

18. 18  Public endorsement by CPSS and S ierra L eone T eachers’ U nion MOHS  Dismissal of two nurses at the Bo government hospital for the sale of free medical drugs to a blind woman, resulting in improved service delivery in both the maternal and children's ward s – Bo  212 bed nets seized as a result of a joint operation carried out by ACC, MOHS and Consumer Protection – Kono  Service charters displayed at the gate of the government hospital SALWACO  All payments for the provision of Water Services now via Account  Identification (ID Cards and Aprons for SALWACO staff)  Radio sensitization on service charter EDSA  Id entification (ID Cards and Apron for staff)  Hotline/Incidence report centre established  I dentification of independent contractors Day Two, Session Eight : Kobo Tools Martin explained the use of Kobo Collect in the PNB programme. Kobo Collect is a monitoring tool through which animator s self - report on their activities and the information is uploaded into the PNB database. Coordinators and Coffey access the database to monitor animator activities and check data . Kobo is a q uestionnaire on the phone that requires animators to complete what they have done each day that they have been working . The tool has not yet been deployed to the CSO coordinators, but this will be done soon . In the meantime , a template similar to the Radio Tracker will be shared for the Coordinators to report on for October and November. Kobo tools has eased the workload for both animators and coordinators as they do not need to make paper reports. Accuracy of reporting has improved and CSO coordinators can now track the activities of the animators t hrough the database . There was discussion on whether WhatsApp was an appropriate tool for capturing stories. It was decided that WhatsApp wa s good for the initial capture of information, but that more comprehensive documentation was need ed to capture more significant stories, in order to share them with MDAs and use in outreach. Day Two: Workshop Closure Lynda and Edita thanked everyone for attending the Learning and Sharing workshop and said how useful it had been

9. 9 The D istrict D irector immediate ly suspend ed all “Saturday Classes” in Bo; undertook to hold meetings with all schools , with the ACC promising to take prompt action against defaulters. ACC/CARL used a Radio programme to share the decisions of the meeting . Table 5 : Session 2, CARL 's Presentation on Accountability Forum s What went well? Well attended by key stakeholders MDAs taken immediate action on the basis of the accountability meeting, because the right stakeholders and decision makers were present and eviden ce was provided to them. It demands very good relationships with the stakeholders both ACC and MDA’s What has been achieved so far? MDA has taken actions, headteacher has take n action and carr ied out his own investigation. Participants offered o ther ex periences of Accountability Forums. These were : Bombali: MADAM All stakeholders were present at the meeting , but MADAM was not very clear on what should be included in the programme. MADAM had difficulty putting the meeting together as the MDAs were wary about engaging, given the critical nature of the reports. Kenema: NM JD 25 people attended in all . NMJD e xtended invitation to all 5 MDAs in Kenema, although Education and Health did not attend . Health officers requested that NMJD obtain clearance from the Ministry. Religious councils were also invited but did not attend. The ACC and a r adio journalist were present. At the meeting:  EDSA spoke at length on what they had done to improve transparency and accountability .  The ACC supported cascad ing Accountability Forums to community level. They suggested that the r eports be presented to the public and that relevant MDA s should answer questions about them . They felt that there was a l ack of MDA commitment at both national and local level s . Western Ar ea : CGG CGG held a meeting in Tombo , attended by MDAs present in the area and citizens from nearby communities . Updates on service provision were presented, including information on service charges . Comments:  Accountability Forums provide opportunities for s enior people in MDA s to learn what happens in on the ground.  Accountability Forums can be challenging to plan because dates and time s often change with so many stakeholders involved. Moi pointed out that joint planning between ACC and CSO is essenti al f or Accountability Forum s to be successful . Kono: NMJD Kono has not yet convened an accountability meeting , as reports were slow in being produced which meant that there was insufficient data to hold a meeting . One was planned for Friday 15 th December .

10. 10 The embedded Radio journalist s in Bo, Freetown and Kenema recorded the accountability meeting s and aired their report s . Conclusion s on Accountability Forums There was lively discussion on the subject of Accountability Forums and the following conclusions were reached: - The setup of the accountability meeting should be contextual – it can either be with one, some or all MDA s, depending on the issues. - It is recommended that Accountability Forums take place in a public hall - A minimum number of att endees are necessary – the peo ple who should attend should agree in advance. - CSO and ACC partners should determine the focus of the meeting beforehand , and the results that they are hoping to achieve. - Key presentations should be prepared beforehand . - MDAs should be primed with some key questions in advance to ensure that important issue s are covered. - The ACC should be in charge of inviting the MDAs to Accountability Forums - Prior agreement should be made with the MDAs before the Accountability Forums are ar ranged. - The radio journalist should record the meeting, edit the recording and air the most important messages. Day One Session Three: PNB Data presentation and facilitated discussion In Session Three , Martin Simonsen and Patrick Sandi presented reporting data since October 2017 and drew comparisons with data gathered over the last year of PNB activities. Key conclusions on the data were that  The new strategy (since October 2017) has been very succe s sful in increasing the number of reports to the PNB reporting platform  There is nevertheless some v ariance between districts: o Kono and Bo rec e i ve most reports o Kon o, Western Area and Bombali rec e i ves most reports through the 515 line  The strategy of increa sing the number of reports made using the 515 line has not succeeded  The r elative distribution of complaints between different MDAs is similar , irrespective of total numbers of reports , along with the balance between age and sex of reportees.  PNB partners must f ind ways to use the distribution of reports between secto rs to identify which sectors have the biggest issues of corruption in certain locations. Discussion o What are the implications for outreach work of the relatively similar distributions of compl aints across sectors? o CGG questioned the focus on sustainability using 515. Coffey explained that self - reporting is the focus for sustainability whether it be 515 or downloading and using the mobile app. Young people in urban areas may be more inclined to use t he app.

5. 5 Day One , Session One : The PNB Journey since August Introduction Lynda Kerley and Edita Fofana introduced the meeting on behalf of Coffey and A CC , with a short update from the previous Learning and Sharing meeting in Kenema in August. They pointed out that the journey since Kenema had been characterised by much activity, effort and focus, and thanked everyone for their hard work. She covered the main conclusions from the Kenema meeting , which were:  Diversify and strengthen animation and outreach work  Diversify public education and radio programming  Create greater collaboration, synergy and promotion of PNB across agencies and the SABI programme  D evelop and take forward strategies to improve MDA engagement at district and national levels and then highlighted the main achievements to date by PNB partners. These included: 1. Public Education : covering the ACC Communications Operations plan and use of s ocial media; also, radio journalists are being provided with stipends to accompany animators; challenges include d a continued over reliance on 1 - hour radio programmes and limitations in the supplies of IEC materials. 2. Synergy with others and SABI : which cov ered early moves to engage a broader range of partners to represent PNB messages including SABI 3. MDA Progress : involving collection and dissemination of data, and development of an MDA strategy; challenges include the lack of success stories highlighting ch anges in behaviour of service delivery officials. 4. Nationwide Coverage : covering the PNB launch in Kono in October, the inclusion of the justice sector and the beginning of the hub and spoke approach. 5. Outreach Progress : covering the validation and retraini ng of CSO animators, distribution of new phones, updating of reporting formats and monitoring trackers (including use of Kobo tools) and regular verification 6. Where to now : including strengthening strategies and actions on outreach meetings, capturing MDA successes Lynda highlighted the purpose of the meeting, which was for all partners to:  share experiences and best practices,  explore challenges and to  plan for the next 3 - month period. Specifically, this means that partners should strengthen their strategies and action on:  accountability forums; monitoring of facilities ;  role s of radio journalists; diversifying radio content;  capturing MDA actions; strengthening MDA e ngagement  capturing people’s stories; increasing social media element;  strengthening the links – between PNB partners and with others

13. 13  Coffey will send guidelines on the relative airtime mix between panels and other forms of programming  Patrick will share the ‘ message of the month ’ press statement with CSOs and ACC for airing on local radio. All a gree d to air one programme per month that includes th e message of the month. Day Two, Session Five : Recap of Day One Martin presented a recap of Day One to jog everyone’s memories. Key points were: i. Strong relations have developed between the ACC and CSOs during PNB implementation ii. Stronger relations hips need to be built with some MDAs iii. There is a n eed for a shared understanding of the purpose and format of each activity (e.g. Accountability Forum, Facility Monitoring etc)  Coffey will draft Guiding Principles f or each activity and share them with all PNB partners iv. It was agreed that Facilities Monitoring s hould be put on hold until the re is a shared agreement with MDAs at district level in relation to role and purpose v. There is m isunderstanding between Coordinators and Coffey on how best to use the 120 minu tes of radio airtime  Coffey will draft guidelines on the relative airtime mix between panels and other forms of programming vi. R eporting to PNB is running at high level s vii. The strategic focus for outreach is on self - reporting by the public, regardless of wheth er it is through the 515 line or the app viii. ACC has diversified their range of communication products as agreed in Kenema Jeremy (CARL ) made the p oint that the partnership with Coffey had strengthened since the Kenema workshop in August 2017. Day Two, Session Six : MDA Engagement - National Level R eview and Strategies to Maximise Effectiveness at National L evel Edita and Martin presented the challenges identified in the Kenema workshop :  The urgent need to develop a strategy to engage with MDAs a t national and district levels.  Engaging with MDAs at district levels to encourage the national offices to be more responsive .  IMCs, who have the responsibility of in theory to address issues of bribery and corruption in MDAs, are not fully con s tituted an d/or active at district level.  National IMC decisions are not cascaded down to regions and the mechanisms that could facilitate this are largely missing. They then identified the actions taken since then:  Management of all MDAs has been engaged to ensure buy - in  A workshop was held with the National IMC of all MDAs (with High - level representation from and very active participation of, the Ministry of Education ) .

15. 15  Mapping of the i nternal relations of IMC with MDAs  Discussions on the Standard Operating Procedures of PNB (see Table 7 above)  Ideas for possible improve ment s to the PNB Data collection Discussion s A number of important points were raised during discussions.  There is s n eed to make PNB reports more accessible and to engage local level MDAs in the issues raised .  ACC w ill increase technical support to IMCs to help identify activities from the monthly data reports and hope this lead to more actions which the ACC will monitor.  The PNB Prog ra mme will help MDAs to communicate their actions. This will motivate citizens to engage with PNB  Need to change perceptions on whether people can access services without paying. Change the narrative.  The activation of district MDAs is critical to the success of the programme and represents a major role for ACC locally.  The SOPs identify key dates in the timetable for monthly action Comments and questions on proposed process es  How can IMCs function at district level if they don’t function at national le vel? Local l e v el decision - making may not be possible without reference to national levels, thus national - level IMC buy in is critical .  There is limited senior level representation on IMCs; membership should be renewed to include more senior staff .  ACC/Cof fey can help IMCs to strateg ise – internal stakeholders were mapped in the F reetown workshop.  CGG made the point that MDAs are not attending CGG accountability meetings – ACC support and authority should persuade the m to attend.  Alice from MCCU stated that MDA engagement been very challenging ; the MCCU is trying to re - engage and re - energise MDAs .  An ACC region al representative stated that the n ew IMC SOP were very good but PNB represents additional work for ACC offices; a n ew strategy is to bring MDAs on board and to see PNB as a benefit not a burden.  MDAS are not engaging with reporting actions that they claim to have taken , and management is not supervising. Actions taken should not be specific to PNB.  It would help if reports on MDA responses could be broken down by regional acti o ns taken. Session Six, MDAs, Action Point s  Martin to share SOP with ACC regions and CSOs  The ACC Commissioner will be doing a road show to re - launch PNB in the regions and to meet with key MDAs. This is p lanned for early Feb ruary 2018

8. 8 What was challenging? Religious leaders do not engage the ir congregation s on PNB for long. After a while interest is lost. What has been achieved so far? The religious leaders appreciated the initiative and were willing to participate. They did go back and se nsitise their congregations to act as ambassadors fo r the PNB 2 suggestions for further improved practice? Sustained relations are needed in order to ensure longer term commitment. Townhall/Community Meetings – NMDJ Kenema NMJD reported on their experiences with Town Hall/Community meetings Table 4 : Session 2, NMJD 's Presentation on Community Meetings What went well? Manage d to hold Community meetings What was challenging? It is difficult to answer questions from the public on the service provision without presence of the MDAs. At times, there are challenges in persuading the MDA’s attend meetings. It is difficult to convince people to spend their time attending such meeti ng s 2 suggestions for further improved practice? CARL: When arranging Community meeting 2 - 3 animators can help gather a crowd and ensure that everyone knows about the meeting. Bring ing MDA representatives within the community to the meeting is a good idea so they can answer questions. Discussion in the meetings are then brought to the attention of the MDA at district level. NMDJ Kono: Providing transport to people will encourage them to attend CGG: Enroll key stakeholders and community leaders, so they ca n convince people to attend. For example, the Student Chairman. Accountability Forums – CARL Accountability Forums gives face to face engagements between users, service providers, ACC and CSO. Parents had complained that teachers collect money for as signments and that payment s were being requ ested for extra classes with an assigned grade. Numerous examples were provided of bribery within the Education Sector . Therefore , CARL and ACC had called the D istrict D irector to an accountability forum, which also was attended by parents and teachers. At the meeting parents made accusation s 40.000LE was being demanded for extra lessons; when not paid students were being thrown out of the school.

17. 17  MDA responses are drafted by MDAs but they could ask for support from ACC , and ACC has the expertise to provide support  How should monthly progress be capture d /document ed? Is a need for a monthly reporting template Day Two, Session Seven: Action Points  Coffey will draft a template for reporting on MDA actions taken .  CSO Coordinators will a lso communicate with their animators over follow up to MDA actions .  CSOs will capture stories from: Reporting on news and radio; From meetings and MDA engagements; Interacting with general public; By following up on information received Day Two, Sessi on Seven b: MDA Successful Responses CSO and ACC participants broke up into working groups to identify examples of where there had been satisfactory MDA responses to PNB reports put together by ACC. Feedback highlighted a number of examples. Examples of Positive MDA Responses S ierra L eone P olice  Transfer of the Bombali D istrict T ransport O fficer to other area . This action was taken in November 2017 .  Reduction of Checkpoints at the Freetown - Makeni Highway ( Bombali )  Dismissal of two personnel found receiving bookings at Tikonko checkpoint. The se actions were taken between O ct to Nov 2017 – Bo  Removal of traffic officers from the Central Business District  Public endorsement by AIG and CDIID boss (Kenema)  Overhaul of a ll traffic officials and bringing in new ones  Dissolved one checkpoint at Motema  Bike Riders Union ( BRU) dissolved one checkpoint at No 9 Junction MEST  Permanent suspension of all Saturday classes for non - examin a tion classes within Bo city and district. T his includes all schools both Junior and Secondary – Bo  Regulation and harmonization of JSS1 school charges for 2017 academic year - Kenema  Banning of paid Saturday classes - Kenema  Refund of excess charges collected by HRSS for JSS 1 (Le4,000,000) – Kenem a  Reduction of school charges at Henry Fergusson School at Kennedy Street  Reimbursement of excess school charges to parents of pupils affected at the Anzarul Islamic Secondary School  Muslim Union Association Secondary School has stopped offering Saturday c lasses due to the intervention of an Animator who presented the concept of the Pay No Bribe

7. 7 Centres on Fridays because Fridays are busy for Health Centres. Facili ties were selected on the basis of the Animators ’ locations . Table 2 : Session 2, CGG's Presentation on Monitoring of Facilities What went well? People were willing to respond and admit to paying a bribe What was challenging? Accessing can be difficult. When Health workers learn what is going on, they request animators to leave. 2 suggestions for further improved practice? Need to create a more conducive environment to allow animators to access facilities. A strategy to promote cohesion is needed. It could include: - Improve relations with MDAs - Inform management of MDA before carrying out facility mo nitoring to prevent misunderstanding and conflict. It could be with MDO, DD or others. - Emphasize that facility monitoring is initiated based on a request from MDA to provide more detailed data Animators should have guidelines on how to carry out facility m onitoring. It could include: - Stay out of facility and approach people with respect - Do not disturb the function of the facility The data from the Facility monitoring should be used through the ACC and not just by the CSOs engaging MDAs. Other comments/d iscussion: Some participants felt that facility monitoring was not a useful exercise and described it as an “analog - PNB”. They argued that facility monitoring was a lesser version of the PNB and did not add enough value. Lynda re sponde d that the Facility Monitoring and PNB data had different purposes: - Facility monitoring generates more in - depth data on specific location for direct actions by MDAs locally ; - PNB data generates larger data set for long term administrative actions. However, consensus was not re ached and it was agreed to suspend facilities monitoring until discussions have been held with MDAs at district level . Q: Are there plans to merge the data to make one data set? A: No plans, Martin will see if it is possible to add to PNB data collection to cover the facility monitoring F ocus G roups D iscussion s – CGG CGG have had F ocus G roup D iscussions with religious leaders with the ob jective of sensitis ing them, so that they would share the message of PNB with their congregations. Table 3 : Session 2, CGG's Presentation on FGDs What went well? Working with religious leaders is very effective because they have a large audience and command authority within their community

3. 3 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 2 Purpose and Outputs ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 2 Attendees ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 2 Tables ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 4 Day One, Session One: The PNB Journey since August ................................ ................................ ..................... 5 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 5 Day One, Session Two: Notes of CSO Journeys ................................ ................................ ................................ 6 ACC and CSO Outreach – CARL ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 6 Facility Monitoring – CGG ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 6 Focus Groups Discussions – CGG ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 7 Townhall/Community Meetings – NMDJ Kenema ................................ ................................ ............................. 8 Accountability Forums – CARL ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 8 Conclusions on Accountability Forums ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 10 Day One Session Three: PNB Data presentation and facilitated discussion ................................ .................... 10 Day One, Session Four: C ommunication Strategies ................................ ................................ ........................ 11 ACC Communications ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 11 Radio Tracker – Presentation by Whitsun ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 12 Session Four, Action Points: Communications ................................ ................................ ................................ . 12 Day Two, Session Five: Recap of Day One ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 13 Day Two, Session Six: MDA Engagement - National Level Review and Strategies to Maximise Effectiveness at National Level ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 13 Session Six, MDAs, Action Points ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 15 Day Two, Session Seven a: MDA Engagement D istrict Responses and Challenges ................................ .......... 16 Day Two, Session Seven: Action Points ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 17 Day Two, Session Seven b: MDA Successful Responses ................................ ................................ .................. 17 Examples of Positive MDA Responses ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 17 Day Two, Session Eight: Kobo Tools ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 18 Day Two: Workshop Closure ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 18 Annex One: Workshop Programme ................................ ................................ ..... Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex Two: Attendance Sheet ................................ ................................ ............. Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex 3: IEC materials needed (ACC) ................................ ................................ ... Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex 4: IEC materials needed (CSOs) ................................ ................................ . Error! Bookmark no t defined. Annex 5: Workshop evaluation ................................ ................................ ............ Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex 6: Flip Charts ................................ ................................ ............................. Error! Bookmark not defined.

6. 6 Day One, Session Two: Notes of CSO Journey s Each CSO prepared a 10 - minute presentation be for e the meeting, covering an aspect of one of their programme com ponents, and answering questions around what went well, challenges and responses. ACC and CSO Outreach – CARL Carl described joint AC C CSO Hub - and - spoke visit to Pu jehun. They explained that they had timed it so that it coincided with a n all - staff Ministry of Health meeting , which enabled them to reach a bigger audience. CARL used the meeting to emphasise that the aim of the PNB programme is to change people’s mind se ts and behaviour rather tha n calling for prosecution. As a result of the meeting , the D M O endorsed the PNB and advised all staff to refrain from corruption, saying that he would not defend them. In addition, they engaged the SLP who endorsed the PNB. CARL ’ s cordial relationships with different s takeholders enable them to access radio programm es, for example they were on a radio programme in Pu jehun. Table 1 : Session 2, CARL's Presentation on Hub and Spoke visits What went well?  Timing for Meetings are important as it can mean that more people are reached and authorities can endorse.  Authorities are willing to endorse PNB.  Cordial relationship with both MDAs and Media are important to ensure outreach. It is an appropriate approach to distribute knowledge and to enhance ow nership.  Good planning and preparation is essential, so the authorities can be prepared and communicate well. What was challenging?  Challenges within the MDA s: Inadequate supply, poor conditions, poor salary makes it difficult to combat corruption.  The re is a syndicate around bookings (traffic) designed from the hem of authority. This has created a culture of silence within the SLP. The ACC should address it at the top level.  More engagement in hub and spoke districts is needed. If we do not go back re gularly the small gains will be lost. What has been achieved so far?  Endorsements,  Big outreach in limited time 2 suggestions for further improved practice?  ACC Lahai Kamara:  In order to communicate effectively and ensure Social Mobilization Community figures and cultural warrant should be considered. Community figures are important to share the message to the people and to encourage ownership. The local authority talks about the PNB as it is their own. ACC/CSO s are only there to guide. Facility Moni toring – CGG The objective of facility monitoring is to capture information from a single location in order to provide data, that is more detailed than that usually reported against the PNB platform. CGG allocated multiple animators to capture data from al l service users at particular Health

16. 16 Day Two, Session Seven a : MDA Engagement District Responses and C hallenges The session began with an analysis of MDA responses and challenges. Participants then broke into groups to discuss how to make decentralised structures work an d how best to engage decentralised structures. BEST WAY S TO BUILD RELATIONSHIP S WITH MDAs (STRATEG IES AND ACTIVIT IES ) A number of strategies were described by ACC/ CSO district teams as being useful for engaging MDAs. These included:  Strengthening e ngagement by encouraging MDAs to sign undertaking s  Strengthen ing c ommunication with MDAs  Engaging r egular ly with partner MDAs but not over burden ing them  Support ing / g uid ing MDAs during their IMC meetings (likely to be ACC only)  Follow ing up on MDAs ’ actions.  Providing logistical s upport  Carrying out advocacy l obbying activities  PNB i nformation s haring  Holding s ector meetings  Capacity building And a number of activities :  Participati ng in IMC meeting s (ACC only)  Holding j oint sensitis ation meeting s  Convening ACC Forums  S haring information on reports/updates  Monitor ing MDA act ivities not report ed on  Taking note of and monitoring any MDA public statement s pledges, endorsement etc.  Encouraging MDAs to verify their actions taken in response to reports  CSOs undertake verification and evidence gathering on Actions of MDAs  Encouraging animators to capture actions MDAs have taken in their localities  Being proactive in capturing MDA actions and sharing them  Engag ing c ommunities in following up on MDA response s  CSOs sharing /distribut ing report s with their Animators  Carrying out j oint engagements in line with SOP timeline s Forums for Engagement (ACC and CSOs)  Focus Group Discussion s (FDG)  Community Town Hall Meetings  Regular IMC Meeting s (ACC only)  Joint Monitoring arrangements/events  Accountability Forums  School campaign meetings  Hub and spoke events  Community meetings FEEDBACK ACC/COFFEY A number of points emerged from the discussion. At the district level it was agreed that it was important to provide periodic and regular reports of MDA activities to ACC . Th ese reports should capture all commitment s made during public engagements, Town Hall meetings, and ACC session s as well as monitor ing and report ing at national level . Other points were:  Repo rt on interval actions taken by MDAs but not reported  Some CSOs d on’t want to have signed undertakings with MDAs  Work with IMCs is likely to be restricted to ACC only

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